The Compleat Dramaturg
Leon KatzThese are the skills, knowledge, and experiences I believe a dramaturg should have when he enters the profession:
1) A critical sensibility, together with the ability to write mature essays and reviews addressed not merely to professionals and scholars, but also to reasonably intelligent, generally aware readers and theatregoers.
2) A thorough knowledge, in depth, of the dramatic repertory based on a wide range of reading in dramatic literature, scholarship, and criticism in all periods and genres of drama, with special areas of expertise of his own.
3) The ability to do scholarly research, plus practical experience in tracking down scripts, options, copyright information, and publication as well as production histories of plays.
4) The ability to read and translate plays from, ideally, several foreign languages but as a minimum one, and the even more valuable ability to adapt the translated text into stageworthy dialogue in English.
5) The ability to read new scripts intelligently, and to write summaries and appraisals of them with professional competence.
6) The ability to cut scripts knowledgeably, with an understanding of how to do so without destroying their logic or losing their essential dramatic and theatrical values.
7) Experience in preparing a dramaturg's protocol--a five- part pre-production study of a play-together with a glossary of the text, for the information of the director and possibly the rest of the company. The parts consist of (a) the historical, cultural, and social background of the play; (b) relevant biographical information concerning the playwright, plus a history of the writing of the play and an assessment of its place in the author's

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