Stealing Home: Israel Bound and Rebound

By Haim Chertok | Go to book overview

BRONXHEAD
REVISITED

The Bronx--or, more precisely, The Jewish West Bronx-- retains for me something of the poignancy James Agee reserved for Knoxville. Save for reduced, aging pockets and a few scattered co-op enclaves, by all accounts its heart has shriveled. It is a seedless husk. I had not daily pressed the chipped, round 4 to rise in the elevator of the six-story building on Morris Avenue, for 15 years my boyhood home, since 1958, the year I graduated from college. Nor had I visited since 1970, a short while before my parents took off, as most of their friends were taking off, for warmer, whiter climes. The building, the neighborhood, the times they were a-changin'. Upbeat, no-slouch, D-train Jews beat it out. Turtle-dumb in the face of more ominous peril, once sniffing out this imminent threat, we Jews can jump jackrabbit-quick.

The Florida coastal span where my parents now live is a transmogrified dream-vision of former Bronx ways and days. Not merely a thinned-out network of cousins and acquaintances from the gin rummy, mah-jongg North, it is, as my mother pleasurably puts it, a whole graying world gone "brown as a berry: Here's the butcher shop that used to be on 167th Street, on the next mall is Ralph, the appetizing man from Tremont Avenue, but wait, right there on the Plaza is the deli from Kingsbridge Road." North Miami Beach, Hallandale, and right on two counties up, the well-heeled, condo coast exudes the wondrous redolence of a Bronx that is no more. It is a velvet fabric of familiarities, confortable and comforting, Byzantium cum sauna, indeed, all of olam ha-ba its senior residents--about whose sun-filled lives from my half-a-planet's

-38-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Stealing Home: Israel Bound and Rebound
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.