Argentina, the United States, and the Anti-Communist Crusade in Central America, 1977-1984

By Ariel C. Armony | Go to book overview

Notes

AUTHOR'S NOTE: This book is based on a large variety of primary and secondary sources, both in English and Spanish. Some of the following notes have been written utilizing a composite style, i.e., a list of sources separated by semicolons. I have adopted this style in two types of cases throughout the book. First, where an account is based on the amalgamation of several sources, I have arranged the references following the order in which they are introduced in the text. Second, I have used this style where I considered it important to provide the reader with multiple sources to support a particularly relevant statement.

Most of the people involved in the intelligence and military activities described in this book were known by aliases. For some readers, it might be important to have access to this information in order to identify specific individuals. I have listed the names and corresponding aliases, where these are known to me, in the index.

Spanish usage for names in the bibliography may present some difficulties for the English-speaking reader. Please note that Spanish-language authors with two last names are alphabetically listed in the bibliography by their first last name.


FOREWORD
1
James D. Cockcroft, Latin America: History, Politics, and U.S. Policy, 2nd. ed. ( Chicago: Nelson-Hall Publishers, 1996), pp. 541, 168; and William I. Robinson, A Faustian Bargain: U.S. Intervention in the Nicaraguan Elections and American Foreign Policy in the Post-Cold War Era ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1992).
2
See Cockcroft, pp. 122-125, 348, and 551-553.
3
See John A. Booth and Thomas W. Walker, Understanding Central America ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1993), p. 147 and footnote 26, p. 208.
4
Peter Kornbluh, Nicaragua: The Price of Intervention ( Washington, D.C.: Institute for Policy Studies, 1987), pp. 75-76.
5
See Jonathan Kwitny, "Money, Drugs and the Contras", Nation,

-187-

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