Patents for Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotechnology: Fundamentals of Global Law, Practice, and Strategy

By Philip W. Grubb | Go to book overview

16
THE PATENT PRACTITIONER AND HIS
FUNCTIONS

when he was in the company of chemists, he spoke as a lawyer, and
when with lawyers, he was a chemist. And when with the chemical
patent lawyers, he didn't mind being just a fifty-fifty chemist-lawyer.
They had his problem, too. It was like group therapy. Patent lawyers
had a profound sympathy for each other.

Charles L. Harness: An Ornament to his Profession

The British Patent Profession 274
Patent Agents as Members of the Legal Profession 274
The Training of a Patent Agent 275
The Future of the Profession in the UK 276
The Patent Profession in the USA 277
The Patent Profession in Other Countries 278
European Patent Attorneys 279
The Requirements of the EPC 279
The European Qualifying Examination 280
Training for European Qualification 280
The European Institute of Professional Representatives 281
Patent Attorneys in Private Practice 281
Industrial Practice 282
The Job of the Patent Practitioner 283
Drafting 283
Prosecution 285
Opinion Work 285
Clearance of Publications 286
Licensing (see Chapter 22) 287
Relationships with the Inventor 287

The term 'patent practitioner' has been used so far to cover all those persons whose profession it is to draft and prosecute patent applications and to advise generally about patent matters. They may be employed by companies or be in private practice, and they may, in different countries, have different types of qualification. Basically, however, their job is the same, and the most important part of the job is to help inventors to obtain valid patents for their inventions. In order to do this, patent practitioners must have both scientific and legal training, so that they can understand both the

-273-

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