Art, Artists and Society: Origins of a Modern Dilemma ; Painting in England and France, 1750-1850

By Geraldine Pelles | Go to book overview

Preface

This study would not have been undertaken but for the suggestion of Professor Meyer Schapiro of Columbia University that I make a comparative, developmental study of painting in England and France during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, in terms of my interest in social psychology. I am also very grateful to Professor Ernst H. Gombrich, Director of the Warburg Institute, University of London, for his stimulating criticism and many constructive suggestions. I wish to thank Dr. Leo Deuel for his helpful comments, and Mr. James A. Guiher, Jr., Mrs. Priscilla Hiss, and Mr. Walter Langsam for their editorial contributions to the publication of this book.

Some of the material in this book originally appeared in an article, "The Image of the Artist," by the author in the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism (Winter, 1962). Grateful acknowledgment is also made for permission to use excerpts from the following books: The Journal of Eugène Delacroix, translated by Walter Pach (Copyright, 1937, by Covici Friede, Inc. Copyright, 1948, by Crown Publishers. Reprinted by permission of Crown Publishers, Inc.); Charles Baudelaire , The Mirror of Art, translated and edited by Jonathan Mayne ( Phaidon Press, Ltd., 1955); and C. R. Leslie, Memoirs of the Life of John Constable ( Phaidon Press, Ltd., 1951).

G. P.

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Art, Artists and Society: Origins of a Modern Dilemma ; Painting in England and France, 1750-1850
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface *
  • Table & Contents *
  • List Ef Illustrations *
  • One - Introduction 1
  • Two - Rebels & Revolutions 8
  • Three - Art as an Institution 23
  • Four - The Language of the Feelings 49
  • Five - Style in Art ∧ Life 77
  • Six - Metamorphoses of the Hero 99
  • Seven - Love & Death 123
  • Eight - Conclusion 147
  • Chronology of Artists 161
  • Notes 163
  • Index 175
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