Nicaragua's Other Revolution: Religious Faith and Political Struggle

By Michael Dodson; Laura Nuzzi O'Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

One
The Nicaraguan Revolution and Its Antecedents

The Nicaraguan Revolution was the first popular political rebellion in modern Latin America to be carried out with the active participation and support of the Christian churches. From the late 1960s onward a vital nucleus of Catholics and Protestants found that their religious faith offered strong motives to join the cause of popular insurrection. These religiously motivated participants in the struggle against the Somoza dictatorship came from all walks of life and all sectors of society, and during a crucial period of Nicaraguan history their aspirations coincided with the goals of more secular actors in Nicaragua's political drama. The result was an unprecedented fusion of the religious and the profane in the making of a Latin American revolution.

In this respect the Nicaraguan Revolution stands apart from the other two major Latin American revolutions, those of Mexico and Cuba. The Mexican Revolution was militantly anticlerical because the church was seen by revolutionary groups as one of the most reactionary elements in society. The Catholic church had been closely allied to the dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz ( 1877-1910), which fell to the revolutionary movement, and it bitterly resisted the general thrust of the revolution. As a result, the Mexican constitution of 1917 dealt harshly with the church, abolishing its right to own property, reducing its control over education, denying political rights to the clergy, and giving the state legal jurisdiction over the church.

In Cuba the Catholic church played no significant role in the armed struggle that overthrew the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista ( 1934-44, 1952-58), preferring to stand aside from the conflict, while occasionally criticizing both sides. However, when Fidel Castro's 26th of July Movement defeated Batista and set Cuba on the path of Marxist revolution, the church moved quickly, although ineffectively, into militant opposition. Within a few years, and particularly after the Bay of Pigs

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nicaragua's Other Revolution: Religious Faith and Political Struggle
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.