Nicaragua's Other Revolution: Religious Faith and Political Struggle

By Michael Dodson; Laura Nuzzi O'Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

Eight
The Churches in a Revolutionary Society

The "Honeymoon Year"

Nearly all Nicaraguans would agree that July 19, 1979, began a new era in the nation's history--but not all would agree that Sandinista rule is fulfilling the promise evoked by the dawning of that new era. At the time of the triumph the country's most immediate task was the reconstruction of a devastated land, both materially and morally. In the final two months of the insurrection Somoza's struggle to retain power became indiscriminate. He authorized heavy bombing of key cities, where even the churches became targets for attack. The Sandinistas came to power determined to assert Nicaraguan sovereignty and effect a social revolution, but the political system they had conquered was in a state of near-total collapse: the old political institutions had lost legitimacy and the bureaucracy was in disarray. In short, the FSLN faced the task of nation-building in the broadest sense. As the Sandinistas saw it, their nation-building project hinged on two primary objectives: creating new political institutions responsive to the needs of the poor majority, and pursuing a nonaligned foreign policy. 1

As Nicaragua set out on a revolutionary course in 1979, it contrasted sharply with Mexico in 1910, and Cuba in 1959. In those two earlier cases the Catholic church had set its face against the revolution. The leaders of the Mexican Revolution responded with a harsh anticlericalism, while the Fidelistas in Cuba paid little heed to the church as they embarked on a program of revolutionary change that was heavily inspired by Marxism. In neither case was the church expected, or encouraged, to play any significant role in the nation-building process launched by the revolution. In Nicaragua, on the other hand, it was evident that a large number of Christians proffered active support to the revolution and accepted the legitimacy of Sandinista leadership.

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nicaragua's Other Revolution: Religious Faith and Political Struggle
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.