Desiring Voices: Women Sonneteers and Petrarchism

By Mary B. Moore | Go to book overview

Works Cited and Consulted

Aristotle. De Anima: The Basic Works of Aristotle. Ed. and trans. Richard McKeon . New York: Random, 1941.

Asher Lycll. "Petrarch at the Peak of Fame". PMLA 108 ( 1993): 1050-63.

Atkens Elizabeth. Edna St. Vincent Millay and Her Times. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1936.

Augustine. The Confessions of St. Augustine. Trans. E. B. Pusey Puscy. London: Dent, 1932.

Baker Deborah Lesko. "Louise Labés Conditional Imperatives: Subversion and Transcendence of the Petrarchan Tradition". Sixteenth Century Journal 21.4 (Winter 1990): 523-42.

-----. The Subject of Desire: Petrarchan Poetics and the Female Voice of Louise Labé. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue UP, 1996.

Bal Mieke. Narratologie: Essais sur la signification narrative dans quatre romans modernes. Paris: Klincksieck, 1977.

Baldwin Robert. "'Gates pure, shining, and serene': Mutual Gazing as an Amatory Motif in Western Literature and Art". Renaissance and Reformation 10.1 ( 1986): 23-48.

Baron Hans. Petrarch's Secretum: Its Making and Its Meaning. Cambridge: Medieval Acad. of America, 1985.

Barthes Roland. "To Write: An Intransitive Verb?" The Structuralists. From Marx to Lévi-Strauss. Ed. Richard T. De George and Fernande M. De George . Garden City, NY: Anchor, 1972. 155-67.

Bassanese Fiora. Gaspara Stampa. Boston: Twayne, 1983.

-----. "Gaspara Stampa". Russell, Italian Women405-411.

Battisti Carlo, and Giovanni Alessio. Dizionario Etimologico Italiano. Firenze: Barbara, n.d.

Beilin Elaine V. "Current Bibliography of English Women Writers, 1500- 164-0". Haselkorn and Travitsky347-60.

Belsey Catherine. The Subject of Tragedy, Identity and Difference in Renaissance Drama. London: Methuen, 1985.

Berriot Karine. Louise Labé: La belle rebelle et la françois nouveau. Paris: Seuil, 1985.

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Desiring Voices: Women Sonneteers and Petrarchism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.