Petrarch's Eight Years in Milan

By Ernest Hatch Wilkins | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
1354: From the Return from Venice to the Death of the Archbishop

On 13 January Nelli had written to Petrarch his brief IX: Petrarch may either have received it before leaving for Venice or found it waiting for him on his return. In this letter Nelli apologizes for his delay in replying to letters from Petrarch, and for not having sent him the books for which he had asked. This present letter, Nelli says, is to be taken to Petrarch by the "neophyte," by whom Nelli is sending supplementary oral messages.

Either before or soon after his return to Milan Petrarch must have heard with much concern of a rebellion in Verona and of its effect upon two, at least, of his friends and upon his son Giovanni. On 17 February, Cangrande II Della Scala, the lord of the city, being away, his brother Frignano seized power. The rebellion was shortlived: Cangrande reëntered the city and regained power on the 25th. BernabÒ Visconti was in the neighborhood of Verona with a small armed force, but took no part in the conflict. Those who were thought to have been implicated in the rebellion and were still in Verona were dealt with mercilessly. Petrarch's friend and former patron Azzo da Correggio fled to Ferrara. Moggio dei Moggi and Petrarch's son, though probably not personally implicated, were expelled or thought it best to leave the city; and Giovanni was deprived of his canonry. Moggio went first to Vicenza: where Giovanni went first we do not know.1

____________________
1
See Cognasso, pp. 365-366. For Azzo, see Bigi, esp. pp. 235-236. For Moggio see Vattasso 1, pp. 74-75. For Giovanni see Foresti 2, p. 74.

-61-

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