Petrarch's Eight Years in Milan

By Ernest Hatch Wilkins | Go to book overview

CAPTER XXV
1353-1361: Addenda

In addition to the several instances, mentioned in previous chapters, in which Petrarch, while in Milan, revised one or anU+0AD other of his earlier writings, or made interpolations in them, there must have been a far greater number of instances of reU+0AD vision or interpolation that we cannot date. The present chapter will be concerned mainly with interpolations that can be identiU+0AD fied as made in Milan but cannot be assigned to a particular year, and to new writings that are of the Milanese period but cannot be assigned to a particular year within that period. Certain Milanese experiences of Petrarch that cannot be assigned to a particular year will be mentioned at the end of the chapter.


The Canzoniere

It seems probable that it was toward the end of Petrarch's residence in Milan that he wrote this well known and very moving sonnet (No. 365):

I' vo piangendo i miei passati tempi
I quai posi in amar cosa mortale,
Senza levarmi a volo, abbiend' io I'ale,
Par dar forse di me non bassi exempi.

Tu che vedi i miei mali indegni et empi,
Re del cielo invisibile immortale,
Soccorri a l'alma disviata e frale,
E 'l suo defecto di tua gratia adempi:

Sì che, s'io vissi in guerra et in tempesta,
Mora in pace et in porto; et se la stanza
Fu vana, almen sia la partita honesta.

A quel poco di viver che m'avanza
Et al morir, degni esser tua man presta:
Tu sai ben che 'n altrui non ò speranza.

-232-

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