Gandhi Versus the Empire

By Haridas T. Muzumdar | Go to book overview

PART I

CHAPTER I
GANDHI VERSUS THE EMPIRE

Gandhi versus the Empire! The half-naked man pitted against an empire in full dress! The unarmed man matching his strength against the formidable empire backed by the mightiest armaments known to history--verily, it is a drama of Soul Force versus Brute Force! At last, we see a fulfilment of Gandhi's own statement: "Working under this law of our being (i.e., non-violence, which in its dynamic condition means conscious suffering), it is possible for a single individual to defy the whole might of an unjust empire to save his honor, his religion, his soul, and lay the foundation for that empire's fall or regeneration."

Gandhi's has been a meteoric career. The swiftly moving drama of this amazing man's career has today attained its culminating phase. The meek boy was blessed with an experimental turn of mind. He happened to believe in the authority of the 'still small voice' from within. His life has been regulated from early childhood by the fundamental axiom that the dictates of one's conscience must be carried out regardless of socially accepted criteria of right and wrong--aye, regardless of the consequences that may be visited upon oneself by society or by the state. The meek boy defied the entrenched taboo of Hindu society by taking lessons in meat-eating; he gave up meat- eating when his conscience revolted against it. The boy in his teens defied religious authority and became an agnostic; he gave up agnosticism as soon as the light dawned upon his inner self. The law student in London derived inspira

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