Public Men in and out of Office

By J. T. Salter | Go to book overview

II
J. WILLIAM FULBRIGHT "Hell-bent on His Objective"

BY MAX HALL

UNOBTRUSIVELY INTO CONGRESS IN JANUARY, 1943, stepped a highly educated and self-possessed young Arkansan, Bill Fulbright.

New members are supposed to be seen and not heard. They should be attentive, run errands for constituents, keep out of trouble, respect tradition, trust their elders, watch, wait, and pray. If re-elected enough times they may be in a position to influence important legislation.

Fulbright was soon sharply conscious of the limitations which the seniority system imposes upon a new man; yet he somehow was able to take the lead in an important undertaking, that of putting the House of Representatives on record for post-war collective security. Before he had been a congressman nine months, the House by a vote of 360 to 29 approved the one-sentence Fulbright Resolution, calling for United States participation in international machinery having "power adequate to establish and to maintain a just and lasting peace."

This was the first declaration by either branch of Congress that America stood ready to co-operate in preventing future wars, and though cynics noted that it omitted the details of how wars were to be prevented, commentators generally viewed it as an historic event, a first step in reversing the nation's traditional policy of isolation.

Congress had found its voice on world organization, and America had found a new and different-looking star in its political skies. Fulbright of Arkansas became better known to the country at large than the great majority of his elders in the

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Men in and out of Office
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.