Public Men in and out of Office

By J. T. Salter | Go to book overview

THE CONTRIBUTORS

ANITA F. ALPERN was born in New York City, was graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1941 and from Columbia University in 1942. Since that time she has worked as an economic analyst in Washington, D. C. Miss Alpern is particularly interested in increasing the number of University people who look upon government as a career.

THOMAS S. BARCLAY is professor of Political Science at Stanford University. He is a native of Missouri and a graduate of the University of Missouri with the class of 1915. After graduation he became a fellow at the University of Chicago and in 1919 served with the Department of State at Paris, where he was for some months private secretary to the late Henry White. On completion of his graduate work at Columbia University in 1924, he joined the faculty of the University of Missouri. He has been at Stanford since 1928. Professor Barclay has served as a consulting fellow at the Brookings Institution and as visiting professor at several leading universities. He has been vice-president of the American Political Science Association and is a member of the Board of Editors of the American Political Science Review. In addition to articles and reviews in various journals, he is author of "The Liberal Republican Movement" and "The Movement for Municipal Home Rule". Professor Barclay has long been active in politics, serving as delegate to the Democratic national conventions of 1936 and 1944, as assistant to the chairman of the Democratic National Committee in the convention of 1940, and as a presidential elector for California in 1944.

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