The United Colonies of New England, 1643-90

By Harry M. Ward | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
A Time for Falling Out

As a result of the failure of the Union to bind its confederates to coercive action, the utility of the Confederation was greatly impaired. The Confederation which survived the crisis years found itself no longer leading the Puritan colonies in united policy; rather the Commissioners now merely gave expression to the particular wills of the general courts. Whereas the Commissioners on occasion had sought to exercise executive powers, such functions now rested indisputably with the individual councils of the magistrates of the colonies. The only real jurisdiction retained by the Commissioners was the "Indian Worke," the administrative policy of which will be discussed in the following chapter. With the coming of Charles II to the throne in 1660, it was soon apparent that the Confederation of 1643 was an anomaly in the royal scheme of things. Its right to exist was denied by royal authority; Connecticut's absorption of New Haven by royal charter, which left only three members, completely violated the Articles of Confederation; and the remaining confederates, on the defensive for fear of royal intervention, acted in many ways contrary to the Articles.

By 1667, the Confederation under the old Articles had for all practical purposes ended. If the Confederation were to be revived, a new covenant was obviously necessary. Except for the need to administer the funds of the Corporation for the converting of the Indians, the Confederation might have ended in that year. The period from 1655 to 1667 is of importance because of the denouement to the Confederacy resulting from the jarring experience of the New England colonies; coming face to face for the first time with imperial policy. Moreover, this period is of interest because during this time the lack of guidance by the Commissioners in Indian affairs, which was a vital concern of the early Confederacy, contributed to the great uprising of the New England Indians in 1675.

Indian problems were essentially the same; but it seemed

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The United Colonies of New England, 1643-90
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 434

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.