Politics and Statesmanship: Essays on the American Whig Party

By Thomas Brown | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abolitionism: Webster's response to, 75 76; Seward's response to, 105; Clay's criticism of, 142-45; reflects egalitarianism of Jacksonian era, 142-43
Abolitionists, see Abolitionism
Adams, "Friends of": rhetoric of, 18-19; organization of, 19; in South, 155-56; see also Adams, John Quincy; Whig party in North
Adams, Henry: view of Whigs, 1
Adams, John Quincy: in election of 1824, 15; Inaugural Address of, 15; seeks "amalgamation" of parties, 15; support of economic consolidation, 15-16; view of national interest, 16; seeks "middle stage" of economic development, 16-17; arouses opposition, 17; charges of "corrupt bargain" with Clay, 17, 127; portrayal of by "Friends" in 1828, 18-19; supporters' image of constituency in 1828, 19; supporters deny "corrupt bargain" charge, 19, 127; implications of defeat in 1828, 20; Federalists' role in election of, 65-66; Seward models himself after, 102; sup porters of in South, 155-56; and ideal of consensual politics, 213; influences Seward's antislavery views, 257n33; see also Adams, "Friends of"; Clay, Henry; Election of 1824; Election of 1828 "Agrarian" Democrats: hostile to government promotion of economic development, 37, 234n26; southern Whigs critical of, 184
"Alabama letters" of Clay: summarized, 146; see also Clay, Henry; Texas, annexation of
Albany Regency: Van Buren head of, 33; Seward's early sympathy with, 96; southern Whigs condemn, 164; position in New York politics, 256n8; see also Van Buren, Martin
Amalgamation: Adams seeks, of Federal ists and Jeffersonian Republicans, 15; Adams' efforts to accomplish alienate professional politicians, 17
American Colonization Society: Clay joins and becomes president of, 138-39
American party, see Know-Nothing party
American System: platform of National Republican party, 20; Clay formulates, 123-26; elements of, 124-25; Clay changes arguments for, 125; see also Clay, Henry; National Republican party; Whig party in North
Anti-Catholicism: of Know-Nothing party, 228-29, 290n34
Antimasonic party: emergence of, 21; spread of, 21; hostile to elites and privilege, 21; hostile to Jackson and party discipline, 21-22; belief in legal equality, 22; and Christianity, 22; clashes with National Republicans, 22-23; attempt at fusion with National Republicans in 1832, 23; criticisms of Jackson administration in 1832, 23-25; coalition with National Republicans and disaffected Democrats after removal of deposits, 30-31, 240n47; base of support in Massachusetts, 237n23;

-313-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics and Statesmanship: Essays on the American Whig Party
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.