CHAPTER XI
"TIED TO THE STAKE" 1765-1769

I

WHILE all the bells of Paris rang for Easter Sunday morning, David had written to ask Colman to tell George to engage two maids--a good cook, and a housemaid. He had asked pathetically that they might have "some character fixed to their tail". He hated continual domestic changes, and knew from experience that he had put up, before, for the sake of a clean house and a good table, with most undesirable characters. The gardener at Hampton, who had been a good one, had left while they were abroad. It seemed odd that he had not waited to state his grievance. It could only be supposed that he had quarrelled with Charles, major domo at the villa.

One of the first calls he paid on arriving at Southampton Street was to the Burneys, "to see, caress and reclaim" Phill. He found himself taking part in the most unsuccessful recognition scene of his career. The little Burneys were well-mannered children. They said farewell to their darling, without shedding a single tear. His master had been away two years. Phill showed the most dismal reluctance to follow him. A few days later there was rejoicing in Poland Street. Phill was back, in the highest spirits. A polite message said that "the little animal had seemed so moping, so unsettled, and so forlorn, that Mr and Mrs Garrick had not the heart to break his new engagements, and requested his entire acceptance and adoption ". Later, when Phill died, full of years, and was replaced by a greyhound, Mr Garrick still remembered his faithless favourite. "You will never take his place, Slabber-chops!" He looked at the fawning newcomer, with immense melancholy. Soft enough, poor whelp! Like all your race--tenderness without ideas." Frances, "Fanny" Burney, never forgot.1

He did not get another spaniel. He got a huge dog, Dragon, an English mastiff. They had been fashionable in the great houses of England since Van Dyck had painted the children of Charles I. Lord Pembroke had one, and Reynolds had painted him with it, and his son and heir. Dragon dwelt at Hampton, but once came up to London to appear upon the stage at Drury Lane.

The manager's return from the Continent had come just at the right time for him to see everyone before the season closed. Rising

-258-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
David Garrick
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 430

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.