Journals of Forty-Niners: Salt Lake to Los Angeles: with Diaries and Contemporary Records of Sheldon Young, James S. Brown, Jacob Y. Stover, Charles C. Rich, Addison Pratt, Howard Egan, Henry W. Bigler, and Others

By Ann W. Hafen; Leroy R. Hafen | Go to book overview
Save to active project

F: SHELDON STODDARD SKETCH

[ Sheldon Stoddard was born near Toronto, Canada, February 8, 1830. After his trip of 1849 he went to the mines of northern California and then returned to Salt Lake City. There he married Jane, a daughter of Captain Jefferson Hunt, in March, 1851. The next month they started for California with the Mormon colonists that founded San Bernardino, the town which thereafter was his home. For many years he was engaged in carrying mail and freighting between San Bernardino and Salt Lake City. He crossed the desert twenty-four times with mail. In 1865 he took a freight outfit from San Bernardino to Montana, some 1300 miles, six months being required for the trip. The next year he freighted to Pioche, Nevada. In 1903 he was President of the Pioneer Society of San Bernardino.

In L. A. Ingersoll Century Annals of San Bernardino County ( Los Angeles, 1904), 653, is a sketch of Mr. Stoddard which tells briefly of his trip in the Flake-Rich company of 1849, and which we reprint here.]

Sheldon Stoddard started for California in 1848, coming via Council Bluffs and the North Platte to Salt Lake. Here a party of about thirty men, under the guidance of Captain Flake, started for the placer diggings in 1849. Among the members of this party were Chas. C. Rich, George Q. Cannon, William Lay, and Sheldon Stoddard.107 They rode pack animals and followed a trail as far as Mountain Meadows, expecting to take a northern route via Walker' Lake [Pass] to the placer diggings. They traveled westward from Mt. Meadows for eighteen days without guides, compass, or maps. They found no water, and were saved from perishing by light showers when they caught water in their rubber blankets and drank it with a teaspoon. At last they turned eastward [southeastward] and struck the head of the Muddy River,

____________________
107
This naming of Lay and Stoddard as members of the Flake-Rich party of packers is an important contribution.

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Journals of Forty-Niners: Salt Lake to Los Angeles: with Diaries and Contemporary Records of Sheldon Young, James S. Brown, Jacob Y. Stover, Charles C. Rich, Addison Pratt, Howard Egan, Henry W. Bigler, and Others
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 333

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?