The Wasps of Aristophanes: Acted at Athens at the Lenaean Festival, B.C. 422

By Benjamin Bickley Rogers; Aristophanes | Go to book overview

NOTES
P. 4, l. 9. Sabazius was the Phrygian Bacchus.
P. 4, l. 19. Cleonymus, before the battle of Delium, was noted only for his enormous bulk and his enormous voracity. But after that battle he is constantly ridiculed for his cowardice in fleeing from the field, and flinging away his shield to escape more rapidly.
P. 5, l. 33. With Little clokes and staves. That is to say, in the ordinary attire of Athenian citizens assembled in the Pnyx.
P. 5, l. 35. An all-receptive grampus. The omniverous grampus with the high-pitched voice is of course Cleon the leather-merchant, the leading demagogue of the day, and the notion that he meant to cut the city up in bits apparently refers to some scheme which he seems to have entertained of separating the various districts of the city by internal fortifications. See "Knights," 818.
P. 6, l. 45. A cwaven's head. It should be a flatterer's head, Theorus being one of Cleon's recognized hangers- on. He is found close to his patron both here and infra, 1236.
P. 18, l. 240. Laches, the Athenian general, had been sent some years previously to Sicily with twenty ships on a roving expedition, which produced no adequate result. It is believed that on his return he was accused by Cleon of having received bribes from some of the Sicilian states. The impeachment, later in this play, of Labes by Cur

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Wasps of Aristophanes: Acted at Athens at the Lenaean Festival, B.C. 422
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • The Wasps 1
  • Notes 99
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 106

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.