The Political Process: Executive Bureau-Legislantive Committee Relations

By J. Leiper Freeman | Go to book overview

Preface

This study grows out of a series of experiences and interests extending over the past six years, beginning with the opportunity to study legislativeexecutive relations while serving on the staff of the Task Force on Indian Affairs of the first Hoover Commission. Subsequently the author had the privilege of being associated with the Organizational Behavior Project at Princeton University while working on a dissertation on the subject of bureau-committee relations in the formation of United States policy toward American Indians. During that time and in the two following years, there was considerable exposure to the concepts and approaches of representatives of other disciplines. To all of those associates who helped in the educational process in the situations mentioned above, the study owes some debt for whatever merit it may have, but they cannot be held accountable for any of its defects.

LEIPER FREEMAN

Cambridge, Massachusetts

-vi-

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