Human Rights and Human Liberties: A Radical Reconsideration of the American Political Tradition

By Tibor R. Machan | Go to book overview

Notes to Chapter 5
1. Murray N. Rothbard, For A New Liberty ( New York: Macmillan, 1973); Power and Market ( Menlo Park, Calif.: Institute for Humane Studies, 1970); Egalitarianism as a Revolt Against Nature ( Washington, D. C.: Libertarian Review Press, 1974). These are Rothbard's major works in social and political philosophy. He has also authored several volumes in economic theory and history and the first volume of his multivolume history of America will be published in 1975 by Arlington House.
2. For a detailed discussion of the views of these individualist anarchists see James J. Martin , Men Against the State ( Colorado Springs, Colo.: Ralph Myles Publishers, 1970).
3. Murray N. Rothbard, "Will Free Market Justice Suffice -- Yes," Reason ( March 1972) p. 19.
4. Jarret B. Wollstein, "Public Services under Laissez-Faire," SIL Pamphlet ( Philadelphia, Pa.: The Society for Individual Liberty, 1969). This is a neglected little work showing how the prospects for supplying services and goods ordinarily thought to be inherently tied to governments are-very excellent in a free economy. See also Chapter 8 in this book, pp. 253-279.
5. Mr. Childs, a personal friend, has made his views clear to me, although these observations are not in writing.
6. This translation was provided by Fred D. Miller, Jr. For his discussion of the 'polis' see "The State and the Community in Aristotle's POLITICS," Reason Papers, no. 1, pp. 61-69.
7. David Kelley, "The Necessity of Government," The Freeman ( April 1974) pp. 244-245.
8. Ibid., p. 245.
9. David Friedman, The Machinery of Freedom ( New York: Harper and Row, 1972).
10. Ayn Rand, "Censorship: Local and Express, Ayn Rand Letter, vol. II, no. 25. For a detailed critique of recent Supreme Court arguments involving governmental control of intellectual activities, see "Thought Control," Ayn Rand Letter, vol II, no. 26, and vol. III, nos. 1 and 2.
11. Andrew McLaughlin, "Freedom versus Capitalism", in Dorothy James (ed.), Outside Looking In ( New York: Harper and Row, 1972), p. 135.
12. Michael P. Lerner, The New Socialist Revolution ( New York: Dell Publishers, 1972), p. 298.
13. R. M. Hare, "Rawls' Theory of Justice," The Philosophical Quarterly ( July 1973)p. 251. See also Charles Frankel, "The New Egalitarianism and the Old," Commentary ( September 1973) pp. 54-61.
14. John Rawls, A Theory of Justice ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1971), pp. 101-102.
15. Robert Nozick, "Distributive Justice," Philosophy and Public Affairs (Fall 1973)pp. 121-122.
16. Ibid., pp. 117-118.
17. Rawls, p. 104.
18. Nozick, pp. 108-109.
19. I have unfortunately lost my source for this quotation but transcripts of the "Firing Line" program will easily document it.
20. Agnes Heller, "Towards a Marxist Theory of Value," Kinesis (Fall 1972) p. 76.

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Human Rights and Human Liberties: A Radical Reconsideration of the American Political Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 1
  • Chapter 2 47
  • Chapter 3 59
  • Chapter 4 103
  • Chapter 5 - Government and Human Rights 141
  • Chapter 6 181
  • Chapter 7 231
  • Chapter 8 253
  • Notes to Chapter 1 281
  • Notes to Chapter 3 284
  • Notes to Chapter 4 287
  • Notes to Chapter 5 290
  • Notes to Chapter 6 291
  • Notes to Chapter 7 294
  • Notes to Chapter 8 295
  • Index 297
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