Human Rights and Human Liberties: A Radical Reconsideration of the American Political Tradition

By Tibor R. Machan | Go to book overview

Notes to Chapter 6
1. For example, David Hume's skepticism developed in answer to the rationalist attempt to model knowledge on the deductive sciences. Ludwig Wittgenstein's criticism of definitions-and his subsequent suggestions that concepts cannot be defined by citing necessary and sufficient conditions for their employment -- developed in opposition to the rigid formalism of logical atomists and positivists. Just how ancient this problem is in philosophy may be best appreciated from reading Charlotte L. Stough Greek Skepticism ( Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1969).
2. Many students of Ludwig Wittgenstein held that their teacher proposed no theories in philosophy and thus had no theory of knowledge, theory of language, theory of mind, and so forth. However, an appropriate revision on the concept of theory itself, allowing that there can be open-ended theories, would avoid the paradoxes generated by such claims.
3. Aristotle ( Philip Wheelwright, translator). Selections ( New York: Odyssey Press, 1951), p. 167.
4. Murder is, of course, a horrible and tragic event. Some will claim that characterizing it as the violation of someone's human right to life is just too systematic, lacks the impact of the actual experience. True enough, words do not generally serve to transmit the full impact of what they are used to communicate about. But it is equally true that such a complaint misses the point of just how grave it is to violate another's human rights.
5. For additional discussions of compulsory education see William F. Rickenbacker (ed.), The Twelve Year Sentence ( LaSalle, Ill.: Open Court, 1974). See also my " 'The Schools Ain't What They Used to Be...and Never Was,'" in Machan (ed.), The Libertarian Alternative ( Chicago: Nelson-Hall, 1974), pp. 245-261.
6. Personal communication from Senator Javits on United States Senate letterhead, November 1, 1973.
7. For how some scientists have abused the idea of possibility -- by employing the philosophical idea "logical possibility" in justifying research ventures -- see Mortimer Taube, Computers and Common Sense ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1961). See Chapter 4, note 11.
8. Rickenbacker, pp. 164-191. Also see the numerous papers by E. G. West -- listed in Rickenbacker's book -- on political, economic, and historical factors of compulsory education.
9. Ibid.
10. Ivan Illich, Deschooling Society ( New York: Harper and Row, 1972), p. 16.
11. Ayn Rand, "Censorship: Local and Express," Ayn Rand Letter, vol II, no. 25, pp. 2-3.
12. It is one thing to have knowledge of what something is -- of the nature of something or how to define the concepts of it -- and another to articulate competently what one knows. Not everyone is prepared for verbalizing what he knows, nor would most bother with trying.
13. David Brudnoy, "Decriminalizing Crimes Without Victims," New Guard, April 1973, p. 7.
14. See Bernard Siegan Land Use Without Zoning ( Lexington, Mass.: D. C. Heath and Co., 1972) for a discussion of how zoning does not achieve its announced aims.
15. This is another harmful consequence of governmentally financed education and scholarship. With tax exemptions for institutions whose research is approved of by the state

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Human Rights and Human Liberties: A Radical Reconsideration of the American Political Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 1
  • Chapter 2 47
  • Chapter 3 59
  • Chapter 4 103
  • Chapter 5 - Government and Human Rights 141
  • Chapter 6 181
  • Chapter 7 231
  • Chapter 8 253
  • Notes to Chapter 1 281
  • Notes to Chapter 3 284
  • Notes to Chapter 4 287
  • Notes to Chapter 5 290
  • Notes to Chapter 6 291
  • Notes to Chapter 7 294
  • Notes to Chapter 8 295
  • Index 297
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