Personality Measurement

By Leonard W. Ferguson | Go to book overview

16
EVALUATION AND SUMMARY

We have by no means exhausted the field of personality measurement. But the methods we have treated are important and should be thoroughly understood. Once they are understood, the basic principles can be applied to the understanding of any personality test now in existence.

There has been a tendency among the writers of textbooks on personality to try to give some comment on a great variety of personality tests. The theory is that the student must know the stock available--take inventory, so to speak--before he can delve very deeply into any one of them. The reader has discovered that the treatment in this volume has followed a different pattern. We have concerned ourselves with only a few tests and have tried to go into their development in some detail. We have done this so the reader can gain some fundamental insight into the methodology of personality-test construction--an insight that he cannot get from a "cookbook" coverage of the subject. This treatment has enabled us to discover that there are only a few basic techniques involved in all personality-test construction and that superficialities, for the most part, are what give rise to the multitudinous supply of personality tests commercially available.

If a student will take the trouble to digest the contents of this text in a thoroughgoing manner, he will secure an appreciation of some of the traditional or classical types of test that current emphasis in the field fails to give. Whether the fault lies in the instructor or student the author does not pretend to know. But he is continually appalled at the lack of knowledge on the part of many otherwise competent psychologists of some of the basic methodologies which have been employed in personality-test construction.

In our treatment of the subject we have, perhaps, been overneat

-418-

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