International Organizations in Which the United States Participates

By Laurence F. Schmeckebier | Go to book overview
The appropriations each year by the United States for the support of the International Bureau were $800 for 1889 to 1892, $700 from 1893 to 1901, $750 from 1902 to 1920, $1,525 for 1921, $850 for 1922, $1,700 for 1922 to 1932, and $1,350 for 1933 to 1935.8 During recent years there has been an appreciable balance of the appropriation unexpended. Additional amounts have been appropriated for the expenses of delegates to several of the conferences.The countries which contributed to the support of the Union at the end of 1931, and the amount of their contribution for that year are indicated in the table on page 70. The date in parenthesis indicates the year in which the country joined the Union.
DOCUMENT9
1925-- Convention for the protection of industrial property. Signed at The Hague Nov. 6, 1926; ratification advised by the Senate Dec. 16, 1930 (legislative day of Dec. 15, 1930); ratified by the President Dec. 27, 1930; ratification of the United States deposited with the government of the Swiss Confederation Jan. 22, 1931; proclaimed by the President Mar. 6, 1931. 47 Stat. L. 1789; Hudson, International Legislation, Vol. 3, p. 1762; British and Foreign State Papers, Vol. 121, p. 899; League of Nations Treaty Series, Vol. 74, p. 289.
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
Association française pour la protection de la propriété industrielle, Congrès international de la propriété industrielle tenu à Paris du 23 au 28 juillet 1900, Paris, 1901. 466 pp.
France, Ministère de l'agriculture et du commerce, Congrès international de la propriété industrielle tenu à Paris du 5 au
____________________
8
The appropriation act for the fiscal year 1935 ( 48 Stat. L. 543) provides that all appropriations for international agencies for 1934 and 1935 may be increased to such an amount as may be necessary to pay in foreign currency the contributions expressed in foreign currencies in the several treaties or conventions.
9
Earlier conventions for the same purpose are cited on p. 67.

-71-

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