International Organizations in Which the United States Participates

By Laurence F. Schmeckebier | Go to book overview

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF AGRICULTURE
In order to obtain and disseminate information on agricultural conditions and the trade in farm products David Lubin, an American citizen, proposed the establishment of a permanent international organization. For several years he endeavored to enlist European support for his proposal, but it was not until 1905 that he received any material encouragement. Early in that year he had an interview with Victor Emanuel III, King of Italy, who gave the project his support.1As a result of the interest of the King, the Italian government called an international conference for May 28, 1905 to consider the establishment of an international organization.2 The result of this conference3 was a convention signed on June 7, 1905, creating the International Institute of Agriculture at Rome. The convention was ratified by the Senate on June 27, 1906, and proclaimed on January 29, 1908 ( 35 Stat. L. 1918).The purposes of the Institute, as stated in the convention, are to:
a. Collect, study, and publish as promptly as possible statistical, technical, or economic information concerning farming, both vegetable and animal products, the commerce in agricultural products, and the prices prevailing in the various markets;
____________________
1
For a detailed account of Lubin's life, see Olivia Rosetti Agresti, David Lubin: A Study in Practical Idealism, 1922352 pp.
2
Great Britain, Foreign Office, Copy of Correspondence Relative to the Establishment of an International Agricultural Institute. Cd 2958, London, 1906.
3
The proceedings of the conference have been printed by the International Institute under the title Conférence internationale de 1905 tour la création d 'un Institut international d'agriculture.

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