The Remedy: Class, Race, and Affirmative Action

By Richard D. Kahlenberg | Go to book overview

Praise for The Remedy: Class, Race, and Affirmative Action

"Three cheers for Richard Kahlenberg! Finally, after all the tired and predictable diatribes from both sides on affirmative action comes Kahlenberg's tough, honest, and absolutely practical solution to this divisive national dilemma."

-- Mark Shields, syndicated columnist and chief political analyst, The News Hour with Jim Lehrer

"The most thorough effort so far to support preferences based on class, rather than race or sex, when decisions are made in university admissions or entry-level hiring."

-- Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"The most sophisticated statement [for] class-based preferences."

-- The Progressive

" Kahlenberg argues persuasively for affirmative action programs based exclusively on class, which would provide all poor Americans with equal opportunity."

-- Library Journal

"The most thorough treatment of the idea of class-based affirmative action."

-- The American Prospect

" Kahlenberg is to be commended for injecting the great unmentionable of American politics--class--into the debate over affirmative action."

-- Jamin B. Raskin, The American Lawyer

"Every so many years, a book comes along that transforms how Americans think and feel about social policy issues. And every generation produces a few progressive thinkers who have something original to say about race and class in America. The Remedy is such a book, and Richard D. Kahlenberg is such a thinker. . . . If there is a morally responsible, socially sustainable, and politically feasible way to preserve affirmative action in to the twenty-first century, it is The Remedy."

-- John J. DiIulio, Jr., Princeton University

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The Remedy: Class, Race, and Affirmative Action
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for The Remedy: Class, Race, and Affirmative Action i
  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface to the Paperback Edition xv
  • Introduction - The Lost Thread xxiii
  • Part I 1
  • 1 - The Early Aspirations of Affirmative Action 3
  • 2 - Affirmative Action Gone Astray 16
  • 3 - A Report Card on Affirmative Action Today 42
  • Part 2 81
  • 4 - The Case for Class- Based Affirmative Action 83
  • 5 - The Mechanics of Class- Based Affirmative Action 121
  • 6 - Six Myths About Class-Based Preferences 153
  • Part 3 181
  • 7 - Picking Up the Lost Thread 183
  • Notes 211
  • Bibliography 322
  • Index 339
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