John Donne's Articulations of the Feminine

By H. L. Meakin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I have been supported, advised, and inspired in the writing of this book by many people and it is a pleasure to thank them here. I would like to thank the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for awarding me a fellowship with which to pursue my doctoral studies, out of which this book originated. I thank Professor John Carey of Merton College, Oxford, both for the initial inspiration to study John Donne (in the form of his own book), and for his great kindness and generosity at many crucial moments along the way. I also owe heartfelt thanks to Doctor David Norbrook of Magdalen College, Oxford, and Professor Catherine Belsey of the University of Wales, College of Cardiff. I am deeply indebted to both of them for support above and beyond the call of duty, and for the inspiration of their brilliant minds and large souls. To Professors Mary Nyquist ( University of Toronto), Elizabeth Harvey ( University of Western Ontario), and Janel Mueller ( University of Chicago) I owe a debt of thanks for various stimulating conversations and their encouragement, but also for the models of exemplary feminist scholarship which they have set. I thank Professor Ernest Sullivan II (Virginia Tech) for his wisdom concerning all things academic and his generosity with his own research. Mrs Katie Andrews, Academic Administrator of Trinity College, Oxford, and Mr Paul Burns, Graduate English Studies Assistant of the University of Oxford, deserve my gratitude for consummate professionalism and humanity demonstrated over the years I was in Oxford. The kindness and generosity of Beverly Clarkson and David Pedersen have had an immeasurable influence on this book. I owe an especial debt of thanks to my editors at Oxford University Press, Jason Freeman and Frances Whistler, and to Mr Freeman's assistant, Barbara Thompson. Any errors which remain are of course my responsibility alone. Lastly, I owe more than I can say to my parents, David and Reverend Glenda Meakin, and to my sister Julie. It is to them I dedicate this book: 'All love is wonder'. H.L.M.

The quotations on pages 2, 13, 15, 16, 17, 21, 97, 98, 99, 121, 134, 135, 136, 144, 213 are reprinted from Luce Irigaray: This Sex Which is Not One. Translated from the French by Catherine Porter with Carolyn Burke . Translation copyright © 1985 by Cornell University. Used by permission of the publisher, Cornell University Press. The quotations

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