In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and Their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England

By Peter Beal | Go to book overview
Save to active project

APPENDIX I
Seventeenth-century characters of clerks and scriveners

This is a selection of notable 'characters' and other treatments of clerks and scriveners of various kinds that I have come across, arranged chronologically according to publication or approximate transcription date (though the date of composition may be considerably earlier in some cases). The selection excludes a multiplicity of passing allusions to scribes which can be found in many other poems, plays, and prose works, as well as many related 'characters' (of lawyers, attorneys, moneylenders, brokers, 'extortioners', 'pettifoggers', and so on). In the case of some particularly lengthy works, relevant extracts only are reproduced.


1. Thomas Dekker

THE BELL-MANS second Nights walke [A description of the Hall where matters are tried in Hell]

. . . The causes decided here are many; the Clients that complained many; the Councellors (that plead till they be hoarse,) many; the Attorneys (that runne vp and downe,) infinite: the Clarkes of the Court, not to be numbred. All these haue their hands full; day and night are they so plagued with the bawling of Clients, that they neuer can rest.

The Inck where-with they write, is the bloud of Coniurers: they haue no Paper, but all things are ingrossed in Parchment, and that Parchment is made of Scriueners Skinnes flead off, after they haue beene punished for Forgerie: their Standishes1 are the Sculs of Usurers: their Pennes, the bones of vnconscionable Brokers, and hard-hearted Creditors, that haue made Dyce of other mens bones, or else of periured Executors and blind Ouer-seers, that haue eaten vp Widdowes and Orphanes to the bare bones: and those Pennes are made of purpose without Nebs, because they may cast Inck but slowly, in mockery of those, who in their life time were slowe in yeelding drops of pitty . . .

[Extract. By Thomas Dekker ( 1572?-1632). From chapter 2 of his Lanthorne and candle-light. or The bellmans second nights walke ( London, 1608), sig. Cv. Reprinted from the 2nd edn. ( 1609) in The nondramatic works of Thomas Dekker, ed. Alexander B. Grosart, 4 vols. (for private circulation, 1885), iii. 171-303 (pp. 205, 207-8). Forms chapter I in a slightly emended version in English villanies ( London, 1632).]

____________________
1
Standishes] inkstands or inkwells.

-192-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Praise of Scribes: Manuscripts and Their Makers in Seventeenth-Century England
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.