Political Bribery in Japan

By Richard H. Mitchell | Go to book overview

5. Occupation Era

THE PRIMARY GOALS of SCAP (the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers, i.e., Gen. Douglas MacArthur; but used here to refer to Allied authorities in general) were the demilitarization and democratization of Japan. Although the first goal was accomplished easily within a few months, the second task was more difficult and took much longer. The Occupation agency within General MacArthur's headquarters that directed political reforms was Government Section. This key agency was headed by Brigadier General Courtney Whitney (from December 1945), whose deputy was Colonel Charles Kades (from September 1946). Reformers in Government Section planned to democratize political parties and to revise the election regulations, but it is doubtful that they anticipated the problem of widespread political bribery. An exception among the reformers was Harry E. Wiles, whose books on pre-1945Japan display a special interest in bribery and other forms of political corruption.

Determined to promote democratic self-government, SCAP began in January 1946 to purge undesirable organizations and people from public life. One consequence of this drastic action was a wholesale removal of politicians from the postwar political parties; this removal resulted in a "leadership vacuum that opened the way for a new generation of political leaders. Prominent among these new leaders were men who had risen to high positions in the national bureaucracy. Since the American Occupation was an indirect occupation that worked through the existing Japanese government structure, the bureaucracy was left relatively untouched by the purge."1

SCAP also promoted democratic self-government by pressuring officials to liberalize national election regulations. Although the enfranchisement of women was insisted upon, it appears that the Japanese were given a free hand in altering the law governing election to

-92-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Bribery in Japan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • A Note on the Transliteration of Japanese Words x
  • 1. Legacies 1
  • 2. the New State 10
  • 3. the Era of Party Government 41
  • 4. Purifying Politics 64
  • 5. Occupation Era 92
  • 6. "New" Japan 109
  • 7. Conclusion 133
  • Index 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 206

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.