Sports Economics: Current Research

By John Fizel; Elizabeth Gustafson et al. | Go to book overview
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significantly slower in advancing toward an academic degree. If the university is willing to bring in athletes as "disadvantaged" students, then the university should consider allocating more resources to help the athletes overcome their disadvantage.

Even after holding constant SAT scores and curricular choices, participants in a few sports still exhibited significantly different GPAs than their student peers. Men's football, which represents the largest number of athletes, had average GPAs consistent with only the thirty-ninth percentile of the student body. The NCAA prohibits these athletes from being paid for their athletic services, despite the fact that football is the largest source of sports revenue to the university. Now it appears that the exploitation of these athletes, the big money sports athlete, has been extended to the classroom. Post-season football playoffs would exacerbate exploitation in both the athletic and academic arenas.


NOTES
1.
Personal data on students could not be released for use in this study so hometown characteristics were used as proxies. The percentage of people with baccalaureate degrees in the home town of the student was initially used in addition to the variables described in this section. However, this variable was omitted because of high collinearity with MedInc.
2.
Women's indoor track, outdoor track, and cross-country were combined into one variable, WTrack, and men's indoor track, outdoor track, and cross-country were combined into one variable, MTrack, due to the high collinearity between these sports variables.

-171-

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