Aiding and Aging: The Coming Crisis in Support for the Elderly by Kin and State

By John Mogey | Go to book overview
variables. Moreover, we only aspire to offer a partial explanation. Clearly matters other than the social characteristics of a relationship affect whether a tie provides support: for example, the psychological attributes of network members, the support recipients' (respondents') own resources and location in divisions of labor, the nature of the networks in which the ties are situated, and Toronto's position in world socioeconomic systems.

To aid interpretation, we also present for the significant variables the percentages of network members who provide the respondents with this type of support. These percentages are also presented separately for intimate and significant ties in order to aid comparability with those studies that have only analyzed intimates.

9.
Johnson ( 1978) reports that grandparents are the most common source of nonparental child care in Toronto for dual income families.
10.
Multiplexity is so highly correlated with companionship that we removed it from the final logistic regression. In part, this is because our operational definition of multiplexity, the number of different contexts in which network members interact with East Yorkers, is somewhat similar to our operational definition of companionship.
11.
With apologies to Shakespeare [ Hamlet, act 1, sc.2, line 65].
12.
Fischer ( 1982b) California survey reports similar findings. See especially chapter 7.

REFERENCES

Boissevain Jeremy. 1974. Friends of friends: Networks, manipulators, and coalitions. Oxford: Blackwell.

Coombs Gary. 1980. "Variant usage in American kinship: The nomenclator effect". In The versatility in kinship, ed. Linda Cordell and Stephen Beckerman, 11-27. London: Academic Press.

Coward Raymond. 1988. Care of elderly parents by adult children: A comparison of the patterns of sons and daughters. Paper presented to the "Kinship and Aging" conference, Balatonzamardi, Hungary, April.

Craven Paul, and Barry Wellman. 1973. "The network city". Sociological Inquiry 43:57-88.

Cseh-Szombathy László. 1988. "Sex differences in kinship interactions". In Kinship and Aging, ed. Peter Somlai, 274-91. Budapest: MTA Szociologiai Kutato Intezete.

Eichler Margrit. 1983. Families in Canada today. Toronto: Gage.

Farber Bernard. 1981. Conceptions of kinship. New York: Elsevier North Holland.

Farber Bernard, and Karen Smith. 1985. Ties with children and siblings among residents of Sun City. Paper presented to the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Washington, August.

Firth Raymond, Jane Hubert, and Anthony Forge. 1969. Families and their relatives. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Fischer Claude. 1976. The urban experience. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

-----. 1982a. "The dispersion of kinship ties in modern society". Journal of Family History 7:353-75.

-221-

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