Health Care Patterns and Planning in Developing Countries

By Rais Akhtar | Go to book overview

icine should be strengthened. 29 Similarly, to appreciate and understand the health problems of Third World countries, an holistic and in some context a systems approach could prove useful because health problems have not only environmental and biophysical but also social, cultural, economic, and political dimensions. 30 Notwithstanding the fact that there is no easy or ready-made solution to the health care problems in the Third World, study of the spatial organization of health care, levels of inequalities, and socioeconomic and political forces that govern health in different countries would certainly be useful in holistic health care planning. The chapters following this introduction will provide a deeper understanding and indicate the directions that should be pursued in realistic health care planning.


NOTES
1.
The idea that the greater the needs for health care the less the resources, in proportion, applied to meet them--and it is not without significance that the "law" was first enunciated by a Marxist general practitioner J. T. Hart, while working in a depressed area in South Wales.
2.
R. Stock, "Health Care for Some: A Nigerian Study of Who Gets What, Where, and Why," International Journal of Health Services, 15, No. 3, ( 1985): 469-70.
3.
R. H. Elling, "The Capitalist World System and International Health," International Journal of Health Services 11, No. 1 ( 1981): 21-49.
4.
K. Lee and A. Mills, The Economics of Health in Developing Countries ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983).
5.
A. Merkle, "Upper Volta: What Can Be done?" World Health Forum 4, No. 3 ( 1983): 195-199.
6.
Ibid., p. 196.
7.
B. Zouari, S. Bousnina, M. Maalej, and T. Nacef, "Implementing Primary Health Care Programmes," World Health Forum 4, No. 1, ( 1983): 31-33.
8.
Ibid.
9.
J. M. Kasonde and J. D. Martin, "Moving Towards Primary Health Care: The Zambian Experience," World Health Forum 4, No. 1 ( 1983): 25-30.
10.
S. M. Bhardwaj, "Attitude Towards Different Systems of Medicine: A Survey of Four Villages in the Punjab," Social Science and Medicine 9( 1975): 603-612.
11.
R. S. Bhopal, "The Inter-relationship of Folk, Traditional and Western Medicine Within an Asian Community in Britian," Social Science and Medicine 22, No. 1 ( 1986): 99-105.
12.
A. P. Sanchez, "Ecology and the Health of Colombian Forest Dwellers," World Health Forum 5, No. 4, ( 1984): 377-379.
13.
R. D. Finerman, "A Matter of Life and Death: Health Care Change in an Andean Community," Social Science and Medicine 18, No. 4 ( 1984): 329-334.
14.
Personal communication with Dr. David Stevenson of Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine.
15.
P. Musgrove, "The Impact of the Economic Crisis on Health and Health Care in Latin America and the Caribbeans," WHO Chronicle 40, No. 4 ( 1986): 152-157.
16.
R. Akhtar, and N. Izhar, "The Spatial Distribution of Health Resources WithinCountries and Communities: Examples from India and Zambia,"

-xxiv-

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