Social Cleavages and Political Change: Voter Alignments and U.S. Party Coalitions

By Jeff Manza; Clem Brooks | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Abramson Paul. 1975. Generational Change in American Politics. Lexington, Mass.: Lexington Books.

----- and Ronald Inglehart. 1995. Value Change in Global Perspective. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

----- John H. Aldrich, and David W. Rohde. 1994. Change and Continuity in the 1992 Elections. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly Press.

Abzug Bella. 1984. The Gender Gap. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Acker Joan. 1973. "'Women and Social Stratification: A Case of Intellectual Sexism'". American Journal of Sociology 78: 936-45.

Aldrich John H. 1995. Why Parties? The Origins and Transformation of Political Parties in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Alford Robert R. 1963. Party and Society. Chicago: Rand-McNally.

Allardt Erik, and Pertti Pesonen. 1967. "'Cleavages in Finnish Politics'". In Party Systems and Voter Alignments, ed. Seymour Martin Lipset and Stein Rokkan , pp. 325-66. New York: Free Press.

Almond Gabriel, and Sidney Verba. 1965. The Civic Culture. Boston: Little Brown.

Alpern Sara, and Dale Baum. 1985. "'Female Ballots: The Impact of the Nineteenth Amendment'". Journal of Interdisciplinary History 26: 43-67.

Alvarez R. Michael, and John Brehm. 1995. "'American Ambivalence Towards Abortion Policy'". American Journal of Political Science 30: 15.

----- and Jonathan Nagler. 1995. "'Economics, Issues and the Perot Candidacy: Voter Choice in the 1992 Presidential Election'". American Journal of Political Science 39: 714-44.

----- ----- 1998. "'Economics, Entitlements, and Social Issues: Voter Choice in the 1996 Presidential Election'". American Journal of Political Science 42: 1349-63.

Amenta Edwin. 1998. Bold Relief: Institutional Politics and the Origins of Modern American Social Policy. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Andersen Kristi. 1979. The Creation of a Democratic Majority, 1928-1936. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

----- and Elizabeth A. Cook. 1985. "'Women, Work, and Political Attitudes'". American Journal of Political Science 29: 606-25.

Anderson Dewey and Percy Davidson. 1943. Ballots and the Democratic Class Struggle. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.

Asher Herb. 1995. "'The Perot Campaign'". In Democracy's Feast, ed. Herbert F. Weisberg , pp. 153-75. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House Publishers.

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Social Cleavages and Political Change: Voter Alignments and U.S. Party Coalitions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Tables ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Sociological Tradition in Political Behavior Research 9
  • 2 - Social Cleavages and American Politics 31
  • 3 - Class 49
  • Appendix: Occupation and Class 82
  • 4 - Religion 85
  • Appendix: Major Denominational Coding Scheme 126
  • 5 - Gender 128
  • Conclusion 151
  • 6 - Race and the Social Bases of Voter Alignments 155
  • Conclusion 175
  • 7 - Party Coalitions 176
  • Conclusion 196
  • Appendix: Changes in Group Political Alignments 198
  • 8 - Social Cleavages in the 1996 Election 201
  • Conclusion 214
  • 9 - Third Party Candidates 217
  • Conclusion 229
  • 10 - Conclusion 231
  • Notes 243
  • Bibliography 306
  • SUBJECT INDEX 335
  • NAME INDEX 340
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