Samuel Taylor Coleridge: A Biographical Study

By E. K. Chambers | Go to book overview

V
THE ANNUS MIRABILIS March 1797--September 1798

THE advent of Wordsworth was perhaps the most important turning-point in Coleridge's life. It is not likely that they had seen each other in the flesh since their first meeting during the autumn of 1795. Wordsworth was then awaiting the arrival of his sister Dorothy in order to start for Racedown, which had been put at his disposal by the Pinney family, and at Racedown, so far as we know, he mainly stayed for the next eighteen months, working on his Salisbury Plain and his tragedy The Borderers. But it is certain that, directly or indirectly, he was still in touch with Coleridge by correspondence. On 7 January 1796 he wrote to Cottle, sending his compliments to Coleridge and saying that he much wished to hear from him. The same letter promised Cottle a copy of Salisbury Plain. This was duly sent, and by 25 March had been read and interleaved by Coleridge, who undertook to return it with his comments to Wordsworth. If it could be printed, he would like to get his agents for the Watchman to ventilate it. What in fact he did was to send it to Lamb, asking him to return it to Wordsworth, who must have been on a visit to London. 'I shall be too ill to call on Wordsworth myself,' wrote Lamb, towards the end of May, 'but will take care to transmit him his poem, when I have read it.' On 13 May Coleridge had written to Thelwall of comments on his own poems by 'a very dear friend of mine, who is, in my opinion, the best poet of the age'. He would send Thelwall his friend's poem, when published. 'And this man', he adds, 'is a republican, and at least, a semi-atheist.' In January 1797, as we have seen, he was delaying the printing of his Visions, in order to get Wordsworth's criticisms upon them. In the spring of 1797 Mary Hutchinson, Wordsworth's future wife, was on a visit to Racedown, and in the course

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Samuel Taylor Coleridge: A Biographical Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 378

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.