Changing Lives of Refugee Hmong Women

By Nancy D. Donnelly | Go to book overview

INDEX
Adaptation: and individual identity, 4
Affairs, sexual, 119-22, 124
Age pyramid: Hmong in Laos, 19, 21; Hmong in U.S., 65, 67
Alienation: of girls from natal family, 120
American law: and catch-hand marriage, 143; and Hmong divorce, 180
American society: as perceived by Hmong, 15, 71-76; and Hmong definition of family, 189
American sponsors, 61, 201n. 16; and domestic disputes, 171-72; and divorce, 181-82
AN. See Asian Needlecrafters
Arranged marriages, 132-33. See also Marriage
Asian Americans: Seattle demographics of, 62, 83-84, 202n.22
Asian Counselling and Referral Service, 108
Asian Needlecrafters, 89-95, 102, 108, 109; organizational structure of, 89-90; marketing practices of, 90; and deception, 93; and inventory problems, 97
Assistance to Families with Dependent Children, 79
Baby carriers, 44-45
Ball game, courtship, 65, 116, 128, 204n.1
Ban Vinai (refugee camp), 58
Batik, 88
Beacon Hill ( Seattle), 61, 62, 83
Becoming American (film), 74
"Beginning of the World, The" (origin story), 36-37
Behavior: cultural patterning of, 8; and gender concepts, 12, 16; bidirectional, 205. See also Men's roles; Women's roles
Benefits: cut in federal, 60; for refugees, 75, 77. See also Welfare
Bilingual education, 83
Birth control, 85
Blue Hmong: dialect, vii; costume, 43-44
Boldness: women's, 16; in girls, 128; in boys, 142
BORA. See Washington State Bureau of Refugee Assistance
Boua Mu (mountain), 57
Boys' roles, 36, 142. See also Patrilineality; Training
Bride wealth, 132, 140-41, 154-60, 163; as protection for wives, 150, 152, 155, 158- 59; in wedding negotiations, 151; unpaid, 156, 178; as price, 157-58; amounts, in U.S., 158; American attitudes inferred, 169; and divorce, 169
Business practices: and Hmong Artwork Association, 103
Cambodians: in Seattle, 83
Cash. See Money
Cash crop: in Laos, 21, 27
Catch-hand mamage, 141-43; and negotia­ tions, 145. See also Elopement; Marriage
Census: in Laos, 19; in U.S., 62-63; of schoolchildren, 83-84, 202n.22
Central Intelligence Agency (C.I.A.), 50, 51, 55
Change. See Social change
Chao Fa (guerrilla force), 168
Chiang Kham (refugee camp), 58
Chiengmingmai (village), 160, 189
Childbirth: in Laos, 33-34
Childlessness: Hmong attitudes toward, 15, 71-72
Children: as reason for marriage, 33; survival of, in Laos, 34-35; behavior of, in U.S., 75-76; as population indicator, 83-84. See also under Training
Child support, 180
Chinese: in Seattle, 62, 83
Chinese traders: in Laos, 46
Choice. See Decision making
Christianity, Hmong, 49-50, 60, 80, 85- 86; and textiles, 111; and sexuality, 121; and research needed, 192. See also Missionaries; Ritual; Secularism
Christian Missionary Alliance, 60, 197
C.I.A., 50, 51, 55

-217-

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Changing Lives of Refugee Hmong Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • HMONG LANGUAGE, ORTHOGRAPHY, AND NAMES vii
  • 1 - Discovering the Hmong 3
  • 2 - Hmong Society in Laos 19
  • 3 - Changing Times 48
  • 4 - The Hmong in Seattle 59
  • 5 - Selling Hmong Textiles 88
  • 6 - Courtship and Elopement 113
  • 7 - Wedding Negotiations and Ceremonies 145
  • 8 - Domestic Conflict 167
  • 9 - What Does Change Mean? 183
  • Notes 193
  • REFERENCES CITED 209
  • Index 217
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