Growing Pains: Russian Democracy and the Election of 1993

By Timothy J. Colton; Jerry F. Hough | Go to book overview

pendent won even though the challenge by a Yabloko candidate almost siphoned off enough of the reformist vote to allow Agrarian party member and well-known member of the irreconcilable opposition in the Russian Congress of Peoples' Deputies, Vladimir Isakov, to win. The less starkly ideological districts of medium-sized defense and industrial cities were usually won by well-known local notables either from government circles or, in the case of Pervoural'sk District 165, the economic sphere.

Ideology and social interests played a role by providing broad boundaries of acceptable candidates. Thus a staunchly conservative candidate was not going to have much luck in Yekaterinburg, and radical reformists were not going to do well in rural Artemov district. Candidates typically read these signals and did not run in ideologically unfriendly districts. After this general socioeconomic constraint, resources of name recognition and local organization determined the winners. This conveyed great advantage to the local political elite who tended to shun partisan identification and run as independents. Where these two determinants came into conflict-that is, where well-known candidates ran in inhospitable ideological districts such as Agrarian Party of Russia candidate Vladimir Isakov in Yekaterinburg-there was some uncertainty about outcome. In 1993 a reformist independent candidate managed to beat off Isakov's conservative challenge. However, in 1995 this trend was reversed, and well-known candidates managed to win in inhospitable districts. In conservative Artemovskii district a Yabloko candidate, a well-known deputy in the oblast duma, managed to capture the opposition stronghold with an energetic campaign in part because opposition candidates split their electorate.


Conclusion

The outcome of the 1993 elections in Sverdlovsk oblast was a result of environmental factors, the rules of the game, and individual actors' resources. The development of political forces in the region during perestroika produced a relatively favorable environment for Russia's Choice within the democratic camp. The reformist camp had been heavily oriented toward favorite son Yeltsin and naturally gravitated toward the bloc most closely associated with him, Russia's Choice, eclipsing the remaining reformist blocs.

Sverdlovsk oblast's socioeconomic environment also favored reformist blocs. Its highly urbanized population tended to be oriented more toward

-425-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Growing Pains: Russian Democracy and the Election of 1993
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 750

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.