Fascism's Return: Scandal, Revision, and Ideology since 1980

By Richard J. Golsan | Go to book overview

Jeffrey T. Schnapp


Fascism after Fascism

The paradoxical loop in my title refers to two January days on which the noun fascism crossed a fatal threshold and underwent modifications so substantial that the very survival of the political phenomenon to which the noun refers could be cast in doubt. The first of these was 1 January 1948: the day of Alcide De Gasperi's proclamation of the Italian Republic -- a republic whose constitution relegated all openly fascist parties to outlaw status. The second came forty-seven years later, on 28 January 1995. This was the date on which Gianfranco Fini, leader of the Movimento Sociale Italiano ( MSI), the principal party that had kept the torch of fascism burning at the murky periphery of the Republic's electoral system, officially proclaimed his party's dissolution, as well as the abandonment of the ideological stances, symbols, gestures, and salutes that had closely identified it with the Mussolinian past. In the MSI's place, Fini announced the foundation of an entity without any real precedents during the fascist and post-fascist eras: a neoliberal right-wing movement, called Alleanza Nazionale, committed to the democratic process, centrist in orientation, and opposed in its very constitution to anti-Semitism, xenophobia, and racism. A right-wing movement that now did not hesitate to recognize what only years before would have been a heresy: namely, that its roots were to be sought less in fascism than in the antifascist struggle. The Resistance, Fini averred, to the shock of the MSI old guard (who, with Giorgio Pisanò and Pino Rauti, promptly walked out), represents "the key historical precondition for the return to the democratic values that [historical] fascism had suppressed." "Let us leave fascism," he concluded, "to the historians"1

Such, at least, is the official story, the one intended by two political actors whose founding acts claimed to have effected a two-stage burial of the Mussolinian past: first, a burial of the fascist regime and of the totalitarian state apparatus it had created; and second, a burial of its

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fascism's Return: Scandal, Revision, and Ideology since 1980
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.