Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations

By Sigmund Nosow; William H. Form | Go to book overview

By the close of the first period of associational growth, in 1898, . . . industrial development had reached the point where the local and state associations were no longer able to cope with the problems, national in character, involving the entire trade and industry. Federal legislation, and the many economic problems affecting the industry as a whole, could only be dealt with successfully by a national association. There had been a great deal of overlapping of work, and confusion of policies by the local and state associations. Therefore, national associations were formed to coordinate and to supplement the work of the local and state associations.

Trade associations had now passed through the preparatory period of development, and were entering upon a period of accomplishment. The concentration upon price activity of the first period was slowly giving way to more positive and constructive work. Emphasis was changed from efforts to restrict competition to developing ability to meet competition. The national association became an organization of service. The conventions placed greater emphasis upon educational and less upon the social activities. Business leaders gave more and more of their time and money for the upbuilding of their respective trades and industries, enabling their national associations to widen their scope, and to make more effective their scope of work, and to establish an all-year-round organization.

. . . . .

The greatest stimulus to the trade association movement was due to the growing realization of the value of the association as a constructive service organization. The association, for the most part, ceased to be merely a defensive organization for the purpose of protecting members in case of emergency. Legislation, court decisions, and general public opinion checked the use of trade associations as a means of controlling the market and of fixing prices. . . . The associations added new activities until today they cover every phase of business. Members have gradually come to look to the association as an educational institution from which they can receive recent and accurate information on the problems within their industry, and on business conditions in general. It is the association which renders valuable service that grows in membership and in power. The success of an association in dealing with the problems affecting its members has, in itself, been an important factor in encouraging, and in many cases compelling, other trades and industries to organize.


C. REGULATION AND CONTROL ·

George W. Stocking and Myron W. Watkins

Businessmen organized more trade associations from 1925 through 1929 than during any previous five-year period.1 In truth, trade associa

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Man, Work, and Society: A Reader in the Sociology of Occupations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 618

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.