The United States of America: A Study of the American Commonwealth, Its Natural Resources, People, Industries, Manufactures, Commerce, and Its Work in Literature, Science, Education, and Self-Government

By Nathaniel Southgate Shaler | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V. THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY.

1. THE LAND.

THE valley of the Mississippi River and its tributaries is the core of the republic. It comprises, between the Appalachian Mountains and the Rockies, about one million two hundred and fifty thousand square miles, almost exactly one third of the entire area of the United States. Within these limits are included nearly all types of soil and life that characterize the nation. The flanks of the valley rest in the extreme East and the far West, while in the North it touches the frozen clime of Manitoba, and in the South the great river empties among the semitropical foliage and fruits of Louisiana. There is the widest variety in its surface, including forest, prairie, and mountain, the richest soil and the most arid, great pastoral plains and closely tilled farm lands. There is the same variety in the occupations of the millions of people who live in this vast area. There are farmers everywhere. There are miners in the cast, in Illinois and Missouri, on the slopes of the western mountains, and on the shores of Lake Superior. There are lumbermen in Minnesota and Wisconsin, sugar planters in Louisiana, cotton planters in Mississippi, manufacturers and merchants clustered in all the crowded cities. The resources for creating wealth are many and various; and all of them are eagerly employed with the energy, and with the success, too, that mark the great West.

The interchange of products which makes possible an advanced civilization requires means of communication and transportation that shall be convenient, rapid and comparatively cheap. This the valley affords, in the first instance, by its extensive system of water ways. The Mississippi is the great central artery of travel. From the head of navigation at Minneapolis to the Gulf there are twenty-two hundred miles of channel on which a steamboat may float. The two giant branches, the Missouri and the Ohio, penetrate the Northwest and the Northeast with twelve hundred and

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The United States of America: A Study of the American Commonwealth, Its Natural Resources, People, Industries, Manufactures, Commerce, and Its Work in Literature, Science, Education, and Self-Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 670

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.