A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather

By John March; Marilyn Arnold et al. | Go to book overview

e

EAGLE CLIFF. The cliff down which Marian Ormsby ( Forrester) fell and from which Daniel Forrester risked his life to rescue her in the antecedent action of A Lost Lady. No cliff by that name has been identified. N: LoL II, 8

EAGLE FEATHER. Eusabio's nephew in Death Comes for the Archbishop. Eagle Feather and his brother dance for Bishop Jean Latour when he visits his friend Eusabio. N: DC VII, 4

EAGLES. The eagles that soar above the western landscapes of Death Comes for the Archbishop and The Song of the Lark are probably golden eagles, Aquila chrysaetos, found in Arizona, Wyoming, and other parts of the West. The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is also found in these states at certain times of the year. N: DC VII, 4; N: SoL I, 7; II, 5; IV, 3, 6

EAGLE'S NEST. The name Tom Outland and Rodney Blake gave a group of houses in a high arch above Cliff City ( The Professor's House). Before going to Washington, D.C., Tom sealed his diary in a "stone cupboard" there, and years later he returned to the mesa with Godfrey St. Peter and retrieved the book. See also MESA VERDE. N: PH II, 4-7; III, 1

EAMES, EMMA. Famous American soprano, born in Shanghai, China, in 1865 and died in New York City in 1952. In "Double Birthday," old Doctor Albert Engelhardt calls Eames"die Puritan." In 1889 she made her highly successful European debut at the Paris Opera as Juliette in Gounod's (q.v.) Roméo et Juliette, and an equally brilliant debut with the Metropolitan Opera (q.v.) in 1891 in the same role. An idol of audiences in London and New York, she alternated between the two cities. She sang German, French, and Italian roles, but her greatest successes were in Tosca, Don Giovanni, and Aïda. Eames, who sang and acted brilliantly and was said to have had the soul of a true artist, made her last operatic appearance at the Metropolitan in 1909 as Tosca.

Eames was engaged to Julian Story, the painter (see STORY), in 1890, but her mother, who had initially approved of the match, vigorously opposed the marriage. In spite of Mrs. Eames's opposition, the pair married at the Registrar's Office in

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A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xix
  • "Handbook of Willa Cather" by John March: Preface and Key to Symbols for Primary Sources xxi
  • A 1
  • B 41
  • C 115
  • D 195
  • E 228
  • F 254
  • G 292
  • H 330
  • I 372
  • J 383
  • K 400
  • L 412
  • M 448
  • N 517
  • O 540
  • P 561
  • Q 606
  • R 610
  • S 648
  • T 745
  • U 782
  • V 788
  • W 803
  • X 839
  • Y 840
  • Z 845
  • About the Author and Editors 848
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