A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather

By John March; Marilyn Arnold et al. | Go to book overview

k

KAISER. Wilhelm II, the last German emperor, is most often mentioned in One of Ours as the figurehead of the enemy Germans rather than as an individual. However, some of Claude Wheeler's comrades think that if the kaiser were shot, the war would end right away. See also GERMAN EMPEROR. N: OnO II, 9; III, 9-10; IV, 3; V, 9

KAISER BILL. See BILL, KAISER

KAISER-BLUMEN . See CORNFLOWERS

KALMIA. See LAUREL

KALSKI, RENA. The efficient administrative assistant in the business office of The Outcry in "Ardessa." Initially Rena is scornful of Ardessa Devine's foolishness, but she feels sorry for Ardessa when the haughty woman loses her elevated position in the magazine office. Rena does everything she can to help Ardessa adjust to her reduced circumstances. S:Ar

KANSAS BISHOP. See BISHOP OF LEAVENWORTH

KANSAS CITY STAR. The newspaper founded in Kansas City, Missouri, by William Rockhill Nelson and Samuel E. Morse. The first issue appeared on September 18, 1880. The soldiers in One of Ours, hungry for news about the war they are fighting, gobble up information from a clipping from the Kansas City Star. The paper is also mentioned in "Two Friends." Nelson became the sole owner and editor in the first year and continued in the position until his death in 1915, when Irwin Kirkwood, Nelson's son-in-law, became the publisher and ran the paper for the Nelson estate. Nelson's will directed that the paper was to be sold within two years after the death of his heirs. The will further specified that his entire fortune would then be used for the public good, namely for the purchase and display of works of fine art. The Nelson heirs left their estates in order to erect a suitable building for an art collection, and in 1933 the William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art was opened in Kansas City. Widely read in Nebraska, the Star had represented itself as conservative and independent but never neutral. N: OnO II, 9; V, 8; S: Tw1

KARENINA, ANNA. See TOLSTOY--"Anna Karenina"

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