A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather

By John March; Marilyn Arnold et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

M

MAC. One of the childhood friends of Douglass Burnham and Margie Van Dyck, Mac became a government clerk in Washington, D.C. ( "The Treasure of Far Island"). His character is based on Louis P. Kenney, the son of A.J. Kenney, the founder of the Webster County Argus (see HILLPORT ARGUS) in Red Cloud, Nebraska. Louis was born on December 3, 1868, and died on May 20, 1926. He was the principal compositor on the Argus when, in 1889, he moved to Belleville, Kansas, and began work at the Government Printing Office on July 27, 1894, as compositor. He held various positions with the office until his disability retirement on November 12, 1925. Even though he worked in Kansas, Kenney maintained a residence in Red Cloud and returned there frequently. S: Tr2

MAC. See MACCONNELL, HUGH

MACALPIN. The prototype of MacAlpin, Nebraska, the setting for "The Best Years," is Willa Cather's adopted home town of Red Cloud, Nebraska (q.v.). S: Bes 1-3, 6-7

MACALPIN MESSENGER. The home town newspaper to which Evangeline Knightly subscribes in "The Best Years" even after she leaves the town. Similarly, Willa Cather still subscribed to the Red Cloud, Nebraska, Commercial Advertiser the year before her death. It is noted in "The Best Years" that the newspaper's editors frequently misspelled James Ferguesson's name. See MOONSTONE GLEAM. S: Bes3, 7

MACAULAY, LORD. Thomas Babington Macaulay, first baron Macaulay, the English writer and statesman, born October 25 at Rothley Temple in 1800 and died December 28, 1859. S: Profe

--"Horatius at the Bridge." In "The Professor's Commencement," the poem Emerson Graves recites at the beginning and end of his career--making the same error each time--is "Horatius," one of Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome. The first two lines read:

Lars Porsena of Clusium
By the Nine Gods he swore.

-448-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 849

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.