A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather

By John March; Marilyn Arnold et al. | Go to book overview

n

NAAMAN THE LEPER. In The Song of the Lark Anna Kronborg's religious zeal flares because Thea plays "secular music" on Sundays. Their mother defends Thea and breaks up the argument by dispatching Anna to read the story of Naaman the Leper. See 2 Kings 5:1-20. N: SoL I, 18

NABOB OF THE CARNATIC. Anwar-ud-Din, Nawab of Carnatic, was born in 1642 and killed in 1749. In "A Night at Greenway Court" Maurepas describes in detail how he helped defeat the British forces that were allied with the Nabob of Carnatic. Anwar-ud-Din was a soldier of fortune said to have attained his power by conspiring in the murder of the legitimate heir, a child for whom he was guardian. After a number of ups and downs in his political career, he was named Nawab of Carnatic and several other provinces. In 1744 he was formally named the governor of the country. The British entered into an alliance with him against the French, who were in alliance with Muzaffar Jang, (see MURZAPHA JUNG). In a battle fought at Ambur, August 3, 1749, in which the British supported Anwar-ud-Din and the French Muzaffar Jang, the 107-year-old Anwar-ud-Din was slain. A heroic poem, "Anwar Nama," was written by Abdi in praise of Anwar-ud-Din and about the exploits of Major Lawrence. See also DUPLEIX; TECUNDA SAHIB. S:Ni

NAMUR. Before Claude Wheeler joins the army in One of Ours, he reads of the fall of Namur, a fortified city thirty-six miles southeast of Brussels, Belgium. Trusting that the forts could withstand any artillery fire, the Allies had taken a position on the Namur-Charleroi-Mons line. The forts, however, were demolished by the Germans in August 1914, opening the way for the battle of Mons, N: OnO II, 9

NANCY. A golden-skinned young slave of Sapphira Dodderidge Colbert in Sapphira and the Slave Girl. In the novel she is the daughter of Sapphira's personal maid, Till, and the great-granddaughter of Jezebel. The story of her escape to freedom is based in fact. Ruhamah Seibert, Willa Cather's great-grandmother (see COLBERT, SAPPHIRA-DODDERIDGE) had a slave named Till (q.v.), and Ruhamah Seibert's daughter, Rachel Boak (q.v.), who was Willa Cather's grandmother, helped Till's daughter escape. Cather spoke in letters of remembering the reunion just as she

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A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xix
  • "Handbook of Willa Cather" by John March: Preface and Key to Symbols for Primary Sources xxi
  • A 1
  • B 41
  • C 115
  • D 195
  • E 228
  • F 254
  • G 292
  • H 330
  • I 372
  • J 383
  • K 400
  • L 412
  • M 448
  • N 517
  • O 540
  • P 561
  • Q 606
  • R 610
  • S 648
  • T 745
  • U 782
  • V 788
  • W 803
  • X 839
  • Y 840
  • Z 845
  • About the Author and Editors 848
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