A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather

By John March; Marilyn Arnold et al. | Go to book overview

O

OAKLAHOMA. Although one version of Willa Cather's story "Peter" indicates that "Oaklahoma" [sic] is the setting, Cather describes Webster County, Nebraska (q.v.). At the time of the story, "Oaklahoma" would have been the Oklahoma Territory. In the first version of the story, Cather's setting is southwestern Nebraska; in the second she substitutes "Oaklahoma" for Nebraska. S:Pe

OASIS SHEEP RANCH. In "The Affair at Grover Station" Lawrence O'Toole had evidently made the shipping arrangements for a car of wool from this ranch just before he was murdered. S:Af

OBERLIES, FRITZ. The German friend of Joe Vavrika in "The Bohemian Girl." Vavrika and Eric Ericson duck into Oberlies' barn so that Vavrika can covertly convey information from Nils Ericson and Clara Vavrika to Eric. S: Boh8

OBERLIES, TROILUS. A boastful, quick-tempered German who is accused of disloyalty by his nationalistic neighbors in One of Ours. N: OnO III, 9

O'BRIEN, MR. and MRS. The locomotive engineer and his wife who take care of Tom Outland's dying mother and informally adopt the orphaned boy after Tom's parents die within days of one another ( The Professor's House). N: PH I, 10; II, 1, 7

OCCULTATION OF VENUS. See VENUS

"ODALISQUE, THE." In The Song of the Lark Joe Giddy's favorite picture of a nude woman, The Odalisque, is probably one of five variants of that title painted by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres. The pictures are similar, the slight variation being mainly in the woman's headdress and what she is holding in her right hand. In all of them, a nude woman half reclines on her left side on a divan. With her left foot resting on her right leg, she is looking over her right shoulder and wearing a scarf tied around her hair. The two most famous examples are in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in New York City, and in the Louvre, in Paris. One, the Odalisque en Grisaille, is a canvas measuring 32 3/4 by 43 inches and was supposedly painted between 1824 and 1834. (It is now thought to have been painted by Armane Cambon, Ingres's student.) The other, measuring 36 by 64 inches and known as the The Grande Odalisque, was painted in 1814 and sold to the Louvre in 1899. N: SoL I, 16

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A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xix
  • "Handbook of Willa Cather" by John March: Preface and Key to Symbols for Primary Sources xxi
  • A 1
  • B 41
  • C 115
  • D 195
  • E 228
  • F 254
  • G 292
  • H 330
  • I 372
  • J 383
  • K 400
  • L 412
  • M 448
  • N 517
  • O 540
  • P 561
  • Q 606
  • R 610
  • S 648
  • T 745
  • U 782
  • V 788
  • W 803
  • X 839
  • Y 840
  • Z 845
  • About the Author and Editors 848
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