A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather

By John March; Marilyn Arnold et al. | Go to book overview

9

Q---. A fictional area of France in One of Ours that had recently been recaptured by the British. No headquarters beginning with "Q" was found in the records of the 89th Division. See COMPANY B. N: OnO V, 9-10

"Q" SYSTEM. A name given the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad in The Song of the Lark. See BURLINGTON. N: SoL I, 7, 18

QUAI. The Paris street where Hilda Burgoyne ( Alexander's Bridge) remembers encountering a weeping woman is probably Quai St. Michel in Paris; for the aspiring actress had lived on rue St. Jacques (q.v.), and the Quai St. Michel extends between Place St. Michel (q.v.) and rue St. Jacques. In "Uncle Valentine," Louise Ireland's studio was probably on Quai Voltaire on the left bank of the Seine. Known for its bookstalls and for the famous people who have lived on it, Quai Voltaire extends from Pont du Carrousel to Pont Royal (q.v.). It was so named because Voltaire (q.v.) died at number 27. N: AB4; S: Un13

QUAI DES CÉLESTINS. The Paris home of Comte de Frontenac (q.v.) and the apothecary shop of the Auclairs in Shadows on the Rock was on the Quai des Célestins, which extended along the right bank of the Seine from rue des Nonnains d'Hyères to Boulevard Henri IV. The Quai takes its name from the Couvent des Célestins (see CÉLESTINS) built there in 1367. N: ShR I, 1-4; III, 6

QUAIL. The quail mentioned in several of Willa Cather's Nebraska works is Colinus virginianus, the bobwhite or partridge found in Nebraska, especially in the river and creek valleys and around farms, where natural shelter occurs. E:N; N: MA I, 5; V, 1; N: OnO II, 10-11; N: OP I, 3, 5; S:En

QUAKERS. In Sapphira and the Slave Girl Quakers in Pennsylvania aid Nancy in escaping to freedom. The Quakers were among the first groups who openly opposed slavery, and the Underground Railroad (q.v.) had many Quakers in its organization, particularly in Pennsylvania. N: SaS III, 3; VII, 2-4

QUALITY OF MERCY, THE. See SHAKESPEARE--Merchant of Venice, The

QUALITY STREET. In Lucy Gayheart the wealthy people of Haverford live on the street that residents call "Quality Street." In Red Cloud, Nebraska, the model for

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A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xix
  • "Handbook of Willa Cather" by John March: Preface and Key to Symbols for Primary Sources xxi
  • A 1
  • B 41
  • C 115
  • D 195
  • E 228
  • F 254
  • G 292
  • H 330
  • I 372
  • J 383
  • K 400
  • L 412
  • M 448
  • N 517
  • O 540
  • P 561
  • Q 606
  • R 610
  • S 648
  • T 745
  • U 782
  • V 788
  • W 803
  • X 839
  • Y 840
  • Z 845
  • About the Author and Editors 848
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