A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather

By John March; Marilyn Arnold et al. | Go to book overview

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TABLEAUX VIVANTS. In One of Ours, Enid Royce's Sunday School presents these "living pictures" in which people portray scenes from art or history. In The Professor's House, Godfrey St. Peter also prepares a tableau featuring his sons-in-law. See also PLANTAGENET, RICHARD. N: OnO II, 2; N: PH I, 5

TABLE-LAND. See DIVIDE, THE

TABOR GRAND OPERA HOUSE. The opera house in Denver, Colorado, known as the Tabor Grand was built at the corner of 16th and Curtis streets by Horace Austin Warner Tabor; the main entrance is on 16th Street. The theater, which seats an audience of 1,500 and is 225 by 125 feet, with a stage measuring 70 by 50 feet, was built by Eli Ackroyd of Denver at a cost of about $800,000. The building's lavishly decorated interior was furnished with Japanese cherry wood that cost nearly $100,000; the chandeliers came from Belgium. The theater opened in September 1881 under the management of W. H. Bush, offering Maritana with the Emma Abbott Opera Company. It was a new high-watermark for the fashionable set of Denver, and the greatest performers in the world appeared there over the next fifteen years. Admission ranged from $.50 to $1.75. The Broadway Theater, which opened in 1890, gradually replaced the Tabor in the public's esteem. Tabor lost the theater in 1898, in a foreclosure which is said to have hastened his death. The building then underwent many renovations, becoming a moving picture house in 1921. It was closed January 9, 1957, by the Fox Inter-Mountain Theater Company because of a shortage of films and the general deterioration of the neighborhood. In The Song of the Lark Ray Kennedy tells Thea Kronborg of performances he had seen at the Tabor Grand Opera House, and as he nears death, Ray muses about Thea performing there. N: SoL I, 15, 19

TAI. He is Howard Archie's efficient Japanese houseboy in The Song of the Lark. N: SoL VI, 2

TAIHOO, LAKE. Before moving to California, Sum Chin ( "The Conversion of Sum Loo") lived in Soutchefou, a Chinese city which was built on the waterways and hills of this lake. In reality, Tái hu is a lake in the province of Kiangsu, about fifty miles west of Shanghai. S:Conv

-745-

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A Reader's Companion to the Fiction of Willa Cather
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xix
  • "Handbook of Willa Cather" by John March: Preface and Key to Symbols for Primary Sources xxi
  • A 1
  • B 41
  • C 115
  • D 195
  • E 228
  • F 254
  • G 292
  • H 330
  • I 372
  • J 383
  • K 400
  • L 412
  • M 448
  • N 517
  • O 540
  • P 561
  • Q 606
  • R 610
  • S 648
  • T 745
  • U 782
  • V 788
  • W 803
  • X 839
  • Y 840
  • Z 845
  • About the Author and Editors 848
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