Ovid and the Fasti: An Historical Study

By Geraldine Herbert-Brown | Go to book overview

3 JULIUS CAESAR

VID'S portrayal of Julius Caesar in the Fasti will be dealt with against the background of controversy recently raised about the posthumous role assigned Caesar in the reign of his heir. Critics have long noted the low profile accorded Julius by Augustan poets, and have long suspected that the initiative for this proceeded directly from Augustus himself.1 The critic lending greatest currency to this view is Sir Ronald Syme, who repeatedly stated that, after Actium, Caesar's heir, having become undisputed master of Rome, began to dissociate himself from his father as he sought to establish the appearance of continuity with a legitimate government, avowing Republican rather than absolutist ideals. In consequence, Julius' claims gradually began to recede and lose ground. It is for this reason that Caesar attracted so little attention in the poetry of the age, the principal record of Augustus' manipulation of opinion on the subject.2

In 1988, Peter White sought to challenge Syme's view (as being the most authoritative representative of standard opinion), and to offer a different assessment of Caesar's publicity during the Principate. In order to prove that the memory of Caesar was not under siege in the reign of Augustus, he provides a survey of Roman architecture of the period in the Roman Forum designed to reflect the link between Augustus and Julius, of coinage advertising Julius' apotheosis, and of Julius' military accomplishments celebrated in the calendars. Against this background he then examines how Caesar fared by comparison with Pompey and Cato as Augustan 'Republican' heroes, and with all notable living members of Augustus' family, by constructing a comparative

____________________
1
Plessis ( 1909) 231; Pichon ( 1917) 193-8; Gundolf ( 1924) 24-6; Green ( 1932) 405-11; Spaeth ( 1933) P. lx; Ramage ( 1985) 223-45.
2
Syme's view that the poets downplay Caesar spans his entire career: ( 1939) 317-18; ( 1958) i. 432-4; ( 1978) 190-1; ( 1986) 443.

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ovid and the Fasti: An Historical Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.