Notes

NOTES TO CHAPTER 1
1.
E. E. Schattschneider, Two Hundred Million Americans in Search of a Government ( New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1969), 63.
2.
Charles E. Lindblom and Edward J. Woodhouse, The Policymaking Process, 3d ed. (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1993), 9.
3.
See Thomas R. Dye, Understanding Public Policy, 9th ed. ( Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1998), 2-4.
4.
C. Wright Mills, The Power Elite ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1956), 9.
5.
For various descriptions of America's elite, see G. William Domhoff, Who Rules America? Power and Politics in the Year 2000 (Mountain View, Calif: Mayfield, 1998); Thomas R. Dye , Who Running America? 6th ed. (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1995); and Robert Lerner, Althea K. Nagai, and Stanley Rothman, American Elites ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996).
6.
For an argument that the relative autonomy of elite groups is necessary for the preservation of democracy, see Eva Etzioni-Halevy, The Elite Connection ( Cambridge, Mass.: Polity Press, 1993).

NOTES TO CHAPTER 2
1.
James Madison, Federalist No. 10.
2.
Fortune, 27 April 1999, 138.
3.
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1998.
4.
Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1999, 478.
5.
Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1999, 417.
6.
Regional Financial Associates, as reported in U.S. News & World Report, 1 November, 1999.
7.
Edward N. Wolff, Top Heavy: A Study of Increasing Inequality of Wealth in America ( New York: Twentieth Century Fund, 1995).
9.
Richard B. Freeman, "Are Your Wages Set in Beijing?" Journal of Economic Perspectives 9 (Summer 1995):15.
10.
Madison, Federalist No. 10.
11.
Quoted in Richard Hofstadter, The American Political Tradition ( New York: Knopf, 1948), 45.
12.
See Herbert McClosky and John Zaller, The American Ethos ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1984).
13.
See James R. Kluegel and Eliot R. Smith, Beliefs about Inequality ( New York: Aldine, 1986).
14.
Gallup International Research, as reported in U.S. News & World Report, 7 August 1989.
15.
Council of Economic Advisers, Economic Report of the President, 1995 ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1995), 232.

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