Witness for Freedom: African American Voices on Race, Slavery, and Emancipation

By C. Peter Ripley; Roy E. Finkenbine et al. | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGY
1619 First African slaves brought to North America.
1780s Slavery abolished in most northern states; slave manumissions in
the South increase; free black communities emerge.
1808 Importation of slaves banned by Congress.
1816 American Colonization Society founded.
1820 Missouri Compromise limits expansion of slavery.
1822 Denmark Vesey conspiracy in South Carolina.
1826 Massachusetts General Colored Association founded by David
Walker.
1827 Slavery abolished in New York State.
Freedom's Journal ( New York, N.Y.), the first African American
newspaper, founded by John B. Russwurm and Samuel E. Cornish .
1829 Appeal published by David Walker.
Antiblack riots in Cincinnati prompt African American
immigration to Upper Canada.
1830 African American population surpasses 2.3 million (300,000 free,
2,000,000 slave), about 18 percent of the total population.
The black national convention movement begins with meeting in
Philadelphia.
1831 Liberator ( Boston, Mass.) founded by William Lloyd Garrison.
Nat Turner slave insurrection in Virginia prompts southern states
to enact stricter slave codes and antiabolition laws.
1832 New England Anti-Slavery Society founded.
Thoughts on African Colonization published by William Lloyd Garrison .
1833 American Anti-Slavery Society founded.
1834 Slavery abolished in the British Empire; African Americans
commemorate the Emancipation Act with annual First of
August celebrations.
1835 American Moral Reform Society founded at the black national
convention in Philadelphia.
1836 New York Committee of Vigilance founded.

-xxi-

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Witness for Freedom: African American Voices on Race, Slavery, and Emancipation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Editorial Statement xvii
  • Chronology xxi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Rise of Black Abolitionism 29
  • Chapter 2 - African Americans And the Antislavery Movement 69
  • Chapter 3 - Black Independence 121
  • Chapter 4 - Black Abolitionists and the National Crisis 170
  • Chapter 5 - Civil War 211
  • Glossary 263
  • Bibliographical Essay 279
  • Index 291
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