The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950

By Samuel L. Leiter | Go to book overview

TAKE A BOW [Revue] D: Wally Wanger; CH: Marjery Fielding; S: Kaj Velden; C: Ben Wallace; P: Lou Walters; T: Broadhurst Theatre; 6/15/44 (12)

The onslaught of attempts to revive vaudeville in the 1940s suffered a mild setback with this uninspired show featuring Jay C. Flippen as MC, with piano-playing Chico Marx of the Marx Brothers attempting without much success to infuse the evening with madcap zaniness. Flippen's material was musty and sometimes off- color. The acts all seemed old-hat, although several of them did momentarily enliven the evening, especially the acrobatic Whitson Brothers and a talented baggy- pants pantomime comedian and banjo player named Gene Sheldon. Among his numbers was an old poker-game skit called "Don't Play with Strangers," which he shared with Marx, and which came from the Marx Brothers' hit of many years earlier, The Cocoanuts*.

The program was filled out with such entertainers as tap dancer Johnny Mack; white-haired soft-shoe man Pat Rooney, celebrating his fiftieth year in vaudeville; magician "Think-a-Drink" Hoffman, who made any kind of drink appear on demand from two empty shakers and a pitcher of water; comedy singers Cross and Dunn; ballroom dance experts Mary Raye and Naldi; and others.

Those who liked this sort of show felt that it was a decent example of the genre. Such was Howard Barnes ( NYHT), who termed it "familiar, fast-paced and funny." Those who did not--the majority--thought it a dull and routine assortment of acts completely lacking in variety. This group included Burton Rascoe ( NYWT), who claimed that the show "is thrown together haphazardly and without taste."

TAKE IT AS IT COMES [Comedy/Broadcasting/Crime/Drugs/Family/Journalism/Marriage/Politics/Small Town/Youth] A: E. B. Morris; D: Anthony Brown; S: Perry Watkins; P: Armin L. Robinson; T: Forty-eighth Street Theatre; 2/10/44 (16)

There were few takers for this "mechanical and tedious little banality about the ups and downs of a small-town family," as Burton Rascoe ( NYWT) described it. The play was "dull, harmless, straggling," said Ward Morehouse ( NYS). E. B. Morris was the pseudonym of a Warner Brothers attorney named Morris Ebbenstein.

In Wiltonwood, New Jersey, in the year 1939 ("the good old days," said the program), resides the all-American Bliven family, father Albert ( Frank Wilcox), the decent and friendly school superintendent; his wife Cora ( Louise Lorimer); their unmarried daughter ( Angela Jacobs), who loves the poetic boy (Richard Basehart) who works in the library; their married daughter ( Marilyn Monk) and her struggling lawyer husband ( Harry Pedersen); their Boy Scout son Tommy ( Jackie Ayers); and Mrs. Bliven's old-maid sister ( Sara Floyd). A Swedish maid ( Gloria Willis) rounds out the household. The Blivens are selected by the inspirational Fireside magazine, the family's favorite, as the model American family." The magazine's quack editor ( Harold Moulton) appears with his staff and with radio personnel to do a broadcast from the house, but their preparations are interrupted by the machine-gun murder

-617-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Note xiv
  • Introduction xv
  • Notes xlvii
  • The New York Stage, 1940-1950 1
  • A 3
  • B 51
  • C 93
  • D 143
  • E 179
  • F 193
  • G 221
  • I 293
  • J 315
  • L 341
  • M 383
  • N 443
  • O 461
  • P 491
  • Q 519
  • R 521
  • S 543
  • T 617
  • U 663
  • V 669
  • W 681
  • Y 711
  • Z 725
  • Appendixes 727
  • Appendix 1Calendar of Productions 729
  • Appendix 2 Play Categories 753
  • Appendix 5 Institutional Theatres 825
  • Appendix 7 Longest-Running Shows of the 1940s 833
  • Appendix 9 Seasonal Statistics 837
  • Appendix 10 Theatres 839
  • Selected Bibliography 843
  • Index of Titles 925
  • About the Author 947
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 954

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.