The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950

By Samuel L. Leiter | Go to book overview

Appendix 1 Calendar of Productions
This is a chronological calendar of all productions with entries in the text. There were a good many other productions offered during the decade, but those not listed here were all in tiny Off-Broadway venues, were general amateur, and were either not attended by the press or were accorded an amount of coverage too insubstantial to warrant inclusion. Even such relatively important Off-Broadway groups as On- Stage were occasionally overlooked by reviewers. Titles of scraps of information concerning additional works may be gleaned from the Off-Broadway sections (also incomplete) in the Best Plays of the Year series. For listings of the numerous productions of Equity Library Theatre, the majority of which were unreviewed, see the Best Plays series and the Theatre World series, edited during the decade by Daniel Blum. When the number of performances for a run is not known, a dash (--) is entered instead. Wherever such a lack of data exists, it is for an Off-Broadway presentation, although the number of performances of many Off-Broadway works is known. For a few classical revivals, mainly Shakespearean, the name of an important star has been provided to help distinguish one production from another of the same play. Several abbreviations have been used to make the list more useful:
(RE) return engagements (as distinguished from revivals); by a return engagements is meant the presentation of a recent work in a manner as close as possible to the original, and with the same production personnel (directors, designers, producers, etc.), although the cast may be different.
(R) revivals; new productions of previously produced works, usually with new creative personnel and a new interpretation. In this list, the only revivals indicated are of works given their initial production during the decade.
(FRL) French language
(GEL) German language
(YL) Yiddish language
Selected organizations responsible for productions are designated by the following abbreviations:
(ANT) American Negro Theatre
(ART) American Repertory Theatre
(BG) Blackfriars' Guild
(DGT) Dublin Gate Theatre
(DW) Dramatic Workshop
(ET) Experimental Theatre
(HT) Habimah Theatre
(NS) New Stages

-729-

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The Encyclopedia of the New York Stage, 1940-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Note xiv
  • Introduction xv
  • Notes xlvii
  • The New York Stage, 1940-1950 1
  • A 3
  • B 51
  • C 93
  • D 143
  • E 179
  • F 193
  • G 221
  • I 293
  • J 315
  • L 341
  • M 383
  • N 443
  • O 461
  • P 491
  • Q 519
  • R 521
  • S 543
  • T 617
  • U 663
  • V 669
  • W 681
  • Y 711
  • Z 725
  • Appendixes 727
  • Appendix 1Calendar of Productions 729
  • Appendix 2 Play Categories 753
  • Appendix 5 Institutional Theatres 825
  • Appendix 7 Longest-Running Shows of the 1940s 833
  • Appendix 9 Seasonal Statistics 837
  • Appendix 10 Theatres 839
  • Selected Bibliography 843
  • Index of Titles 925
  • About the Author 947
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